Translating consumer neuroscience into advertising research and education

Panel presentation to the American Academy of Advertising. Virtual Conference.

Abstract: Despite the increasing application of consumer neuroscience in advertising research in both academia and industry, many misconceptions about neuroscience research and data persist. One of the challenges for the consumer neuroscience researcher is dispelling these misconceptions for key stakeholders. In this panel, we will address some of these misconceptions with a focus on translating consumer neuroscience knowledge to new biopsychological researchers (i.e., faculty and students) and industry partners. This panel aspires to enhance the accessibility of consumer neuroscience research among advertising scholars in research, teaching, and service. Our expert panelists will discuss topics such as what neuroscience data actually tell us and how it can be used to complement self-report data, conducting web-based biometric research, managing expectations of industry partners, navigating timelines necessary to collect neuroscience data while adhering to important deadlines (such as tenure), and the increasing ease of use and decreasing expense of these measures that will allow more advertising researchers to employ such innovative research approaches.

Glenna Read 

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