Otherization of Africa: How American media framed people with HIV/AIDS in Africa from 1987 to 2017.

Paper to be presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC), Washington, DC.

Abstract: This study examined otherization framing of people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa in American print news from 1987-2007. The results of a content analysis of a representative sample of news articles from three outlets (N=421) show that American media overwhelmingly used otherization frames throughout the 20-year period, resulting in a large percentage of negatively toned coverage in American newspaper reporting of the topic on the African continent. The study represents the first attempt to quantify otherization framing of Africa in HIV/AIDS context. The implications for international reporting and theory are discussed.

Michael Cacciatore  Ivanka Pjesivac 

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