Using directional cues in immersive journalism: The impact on information processing, narrative transportation, presence, news attitudes, and credibility.

Paper to be presented at the Annual Convention of International Communication Association (ICA). Washington, DC.

Abstract: This study examined the effects of the use of directional cues in immersive journalism on information recall, attitudes towards a news story, narrative transportation, presence, and message credibility by conducting a randomized between-subjects three-condition lab experiment (N=90) with community participants using three versions of originally produced 360̊ video news story. The study found that presence of directional cues in 360̊ news story improved participants’ recall of statistics from the story, but did not improve recall of verbal information. In addition, the presence of directional cues impacted participants’ perceptions of message credibility, but did not impact their narrative transportation, attitudes towards the 360̊ news story, or sense of presence. The study findings are discussed in light of information processing theories.

Matthew Binford  Keith Herndon  Jooyoung Kim  Bartosz Wojdynski 

Related Research


Protest reporting across clientelist media systems

Harlow, S., Camaj, L., & Pjesivac, I. (2022). Protest reporting across clientelist media systems. International Communication Gazette. Advance online publication: doi.org/10.1177/1748048522114686 Abstract:Most protest paradigm studies examining news media’s portrayals of protesters are based on an […]

Ivanka Pjesivac
read more
Listening for The Echo: How Our Students Are Stepping Into, Embracing Community Journalism

Amanda Bright, “Listening for The Echo: How Our Students Are Stepping Into, Embracing Community Journalism,” Teaching Journalism & Mass Communication, Vol. 12, no. 2 (2022), pp. 77-80 http://www.aejmc.us/spig/journal Abstract: The […]

Amanda Bright
read more