The Effects of Corrective Communication and Employee Backup on the Effectiveness of Fighting Crisis Misinformation

Accepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Public Relations Division, May 21-25, 2020, Gold Coast, Australia.

Accepted for presentation at the International Communication Association (ICA) Conference, Public Relations Division, May 21-25, 2020, Gold Coast, Australia.

Abstract: Crisis misinformation, including false information about a crisis or a crisis-stricken organization, has become a fundamental threat to organizational wellbeing. Effective crisis response geared toward fighting crisis misinformation demands a more systematic approach to corrective communication. Grounded in misinformation debunking theory, this study aims to advance misinformation research in public relations and organizational crisis communication. An online experiment using a U.S. adult sample was conducted to examine the effects of corrective communication strategy (simple rebuttal vs. factual elaboration) and employee backup (present vs. absent) on perceived message quality, organizational reputation, and perceived crisis responsibility. Results show: 1) the use of factual elaboration and the presence of employee backup were direct contributors to crisis response effectiveness; and 2) perceived message quality mediates the effect of corrective communication. This study provides insights into advancing crisis communication theory and offers evidence-based recommendations for practitioners to combat crisis misinformation more effectively.

Yan Jin  Xuerong Lu 

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