The amplification effects of camera point-of-view (POV) revisited—racial disparity in evaluations of police use of force videos in the post-George Floyd era

Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Detroit, MI.

Abstract: This study is a 2 (body-worn vs. onlooker camera) by 2 (dark skin vs. light skin citizens) within-subjects experiment that examines how camera POV affects racial bias in viewers of police use of force videos. Results showed that viewers evaluated the police more negatively when viewing videos with citizens of dark skin compared to the ones with light-skin citizens, especially when the videos were filmed by body-worn cameras (BWC).

Glenna Read 

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