Latino trust in journalists and the 2016 U.S. general election: An analysis of voter responses

Paper presented to the Minorities and Communication Division, AEJMC, TORONTO, Canada

Additional author: Patricia Moy

Abstract: This paper reports qualitative and quantitative data from a national online panel survey of Latinos (N=720) after the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Participants reported in their closed-ended responses a level of distrust toward the news organizations that largely parallels national figures. In open-ended responses, Latinos cited cable news journalists most as trusted journalists, with additional differences by partisanship and whether individuals were U.S. or foreign born. Implications for political news consumption and identity are discussed.

María E. Len-Ríos  Ivanka Pjesivac 

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