Effects of Message Framing on Influenza Vaccination

Sungsu Kim (Grady PhD Student), Ivanka Pjesivac, and Yan Jin. “Effects of Message Framing on Influenza Vaccination: Understanding the Role of Risk Disclosure, Perceived Vaccine Efficacy, and Felt Ambivalence.” Accepted for presentation at the Annual Conference of International Communication Association, San Diego, CA, May 25-29, 2017.

Abstract: The current study examined the effects of framing in promotional health messages on intention to vaccinate against seasonal influenza virus. The findings of the experimental study (n=86) indicated that exposure to both benefits and side effects of vaccination (gain-framed with risk disclosure message) led to lower intention to receive the flu vaccine. This relationship was mediated by both perceived vaccine efficacy and felt ambivalence in sequential order, revealing the underlying psychological mechanisms important for understanding health related behaviors. Theoretical implications of constructing sub-framed messages are discussed and the concept of second-order framing is introduced.
Abstract: The current study examined the effects of framing in promotional health messages on intention to vaccinate against seasonal influenza virus. The findings of the experimental study (n=86) indicated that exposure to both benefits and side effects of vaccination (gain-framed with risk disclosure message) led to lower intention to receive the flu vaccine. This relationship was mediated by both perceived vaccine efficacy and felt ambivalence in sequential order, revealing the underlying psychological mechanisms important for understanding health related behaviors. Theoretical implications of constructing sub-framed messages are discussed and the concept of second-order framing is introduced.

Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac 

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