Routine and individual-level influences of newspaper front-page images: A study of wire photographs, staff photojournalism, race and gender

Research-in-progress accepted to the visual communication division of the 2021 AEJMC Southeast Colloquium

Abstract: Influences upon the visual content of US front pages are assessed at two levels. At the routine-level, visual differences are compared based on whether photographs are taken by on-staff photojournalists or are wire-provided. At the individual-level, differences are assessed based on the photographer’s race and gender. This study uncovers visual implications of fewer staff photojournalists in present day newspapers, a news image environment increasingly dominated by a small number of central agencies, and the visual consequences brought about by more or less diverse photojournalists.

Kyser Lough 

Related Research


Cementing Their Heroes: Historical Newspaper Coverage of Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Confederate Monuments

Little, Alexia (Grady M.A.) (Forthcoming). Cementing Their Heroes: Historical Newspaper Coverage of Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Confederate Monuments. Journalism History.  Abstract: Following continued conflicts about Confederate monuments in American society, this study explores Civil War memory encapsulated in newspaper coverage of the initial construction and dedication of four Confederate monument. Discourse and narrative analyses of […]

read more
The power of political journalists as deception detectors and how politicians reactivate voters’ truth-default

Abstract: Journalists serve as deception detectors for voters. Sometimes politicians refute journalists’ assertions. How do voters discern whom to believe? Based on cognitive sequences posited by truth-default theory (TDT), experiments tested voters’ reactions to alleged deceptiveness in a political news interview. In Study 1 (N = 209) perceptions of a politician being truthfully or falsely […]

David ClementsonTong Xie
read more