Judging photojournalism: The metajournalistic discourse of judges in two photojournalism competitions

Presented in the Visual Communication Division at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication 2020 Annual Conference, San Francisco.

Abstract: This study investigates how discussions during photojournalism award judging can be used as metajournalistic discourse to gain insight about the definition, boundaries and legitimization of the field. Photojournalism awards shape the field by showing what is valued, but the process of judging can also provide insight. The author carries this out through discourse analysis of publicly-available video of judging rounds from two photojournalism competitions, Best of Photojournalism (BOP) and Pictures of the Year International (POYi).

Kyser Lough 

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