Context clues: News audiences and their higher valuation of contextualist journalistic roles

Paper accepted to the Journalism Studies division of the International Communication Association 2020 conference, Gold Coast..

Abstract: This study explores the news audiences’ perceptions of journalistic roles, in particular the contextualist role, through a U.S. nationally-representative survey. As members of the public lose trust and interest in the media, some outlets are turning to forms of reporting like constructive/solutions journalism to provide a greater context to news consumers. Our survey shows that the American public values such reporting, and even places its functions above many of the others traditionally assigned to journalism.

Kyser Lough 

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