Do Consumers Avoid Watching Over-the-Counter Drug Advertisements

Jisu Huh, Denise E. DeLorme, and Leonard N. Reid, “Do Consumers Avoid Watching Over-the-Counter Drug Advertisements? An Analysis of Cognitive and Affective Factors that Prompt Advertising Avoidance,”Journal of Advertising Research, December 2015, Volume 55, No. 4, 401-415.

Abstract: Do consumers avoid viewing over-the-counter (OTC) pharmaceutical advertisements? And, if so, why? The authors of the current study tested their proposed “Ad Avoidance Model” by surveying a nationally-representative sample of U.S. adults about their reactions to advertisements for OTC drugs (specifically analgesics). The researchers focused on how four advertising-reaction factors—two cognitive (perceived utility and skepticism) and two affective (irritation and attitude toward advertising)—influenced avoidance behaviors. The results revealed that avoidance was directly linked to irritation and attitude, although attitude also partially mediated the relationship between irritation and avoidance. Age and socioeconomic status also played roles in these relationships.

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