Janice Hume named Grady College associate dean for academic affairs

Grady College has announced the appointment of Janice Hume, the Carolyn McKenzie and Don E. Carter Chair for Excellence in Journalism, as the new associate dean for academic affairs effective Aug. 1, 2022.

Hume is currently the Department of Journalism Head and will assume the associate dean position from María E. Len-Ríos (MA ’95) who is joining the University of Minnesota as associate director of the Hubbard School of Journalism.

“Dr. Hume has been a stellar leader in the College, and the Journalism department has been as strong as ever under her leadership as department chair,” said Charles N. Davis, dean of Grady College. “The addition of Dr. Hume to this next level of our leadership team will ensure that we continue progress toward our commitment to excellence, growth and educational leadership on behalf of our students.”

In her new role, Hume will continue as the named Carter Chair which was awarded to her in 2015.

“The College means a lot to me,” Hume said, “and I look forward to serving it in a new way. I’m excited about the challenge.”

Janice Hume shakes hands with a Levin Leader as Keith Herndon looks on.
Janice Hume shakes hands with Madison Franklin as Keith Herndon prepares to present Franklin with a Levin Leader medal March 3, 2022.

Hume joined Grady College in 2001 and became Department of Journalism head in 2013. She teaches courses in media history, ethics & diversity and media credibility on the undergraduate and graduate level. Her research focuses on American journalism history, public memory and media coverage of death and is frequently quoted in the media about the role obituaries have in collective memory. Hume received her Ph.D., master’s and bachelor of journalism degrees from the University of Missouri.

Prior to joining UGA, Hume spent twelve years as a newspaper reporter and features editor. She was lifestyle and arts editor at the Mobile Register (Alabama) and she served on the faculty of the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kansas State University. She has authored three books including her most recent, “Popular Media and the American Revolution.” She has also published research in a number of academic journals, including “Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly,” “Journalism History” and “American Journalism,” among others.

Hume has been the recipient of the American Journalism Historians Association’s National Award for Excellence in Teaching. She is an SEC Academic Leadership Development Program Fellow and served on the Scripps Howard Academic Leadership Academy.

“I am forever grateful to the faculty and staff in Journalism,” Hume added. “They are a remarkable, talented group of scholars, teachers and colleagues. They always step up when needed, and that has made my time as department head a real joy.”

Grady doctoral student’s fake news research becomes book

Marcus E. Howard, journalist and Grady doctoral student, recently wrote a media literacy book in partnership with the Georgia Humanities Council and Atlanta Press Club.

“How Journalists and the Public Shape Our Democracy: From Social Media and ‘Fake News’ to Reporting Just the Facts” educate the public on the societal phenomenon surrounding facts and misperceptions of journalism.

Janice Hume, head of Grady’s journalism department and Carolyn McKenzie and Don E. Carter Chair for Excellence in Journalism; Kelly Caudle, Georgia Humanities; and Lauri Strauss, Atlanta Press Club, approached Howard about the controversial phenomenon of “fake news.”

“As we see globally today and historically, people suffer when there is only one version of the truth handed down from the government,” Howard said.

As a journalist for more than ten years, Howard agrees that criticism of the press is good, however, political attacks on the media can alter accountability of reporting. He hopes the book will demystify journalists’ efforts for timely and accurate news while also demonstrating to readers how mistakes occur and how the profession works towards correcting and improving journalism.

“Marcus did a fantastic job pulling together all the research and writing on a tight timeline,” Caudle said.

The book is in narrative form, when each chapter starts with a story related to the topic. Issues range from social media to native advertisements.

“One minute you’ll be reading about the journalism ideals of Walter Lippmann and the next minute you’ll learn how the Kardashians’ use of native advertisements landed them in hot water,” Howard said.

Howard spent last summer researching on campus and reaching out to media experts at Grady and within the state. Monica Pearson (MA ’14), a retired WSB-TV Atlanta news anchor, wrote the forward of the book in order to bring trusted credibility to the project. Howard also spent the summer attending panels and events.

“[Atlanta] featured panel discussions with prominent journalists who talked about many of the issues raised in the book,” Howard said. “The turnout was impressive, which I think is a testament to how interested and concerned people are about the state of news media. I hope the book enlightens them on their paths in some small way.”

Read Howard’s book, available online, here.

Hume named Carolyn McKenzie and Don E. Carter Chair for Excellence in Journalism

Janice Hume has been named the Carolyn McKenzie and Don E. Carter Chair for Excellence in Journalism at the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Hume serves as the head of the Department of Journalism.

The purpose of the Carter Chair is to teach journalistic excellence to students entering the profession, emphasizing journalistic values of clarity, accuracy, fairness, balance and credibility—values that characterize the Carters’ professional careers. John Greenman previously held the chair until his retirement in 2015.

“Dr. Hume upholds the legacy of Don Carter, a journalist’s journalist,” said Charles Davis, dean of Grady College. “Her passion for journalism education embodies the values we seek to foster throughout the college, and we’re just so fortunate to have her leadership as a model for students today and tomorrow.”

Don Carter (ABJ ’38) began his career as the editor-in-chief at The Red & Black before working as a reporter and editor at multiple newspapers across the county, including positions in Atlanta, New York City, Washington, D.C., and Miami. He was the founding managing editor of The National Observer before serving as vice president for news at Knight-Ridder until his retirement in 1982.

<Don E. Carter shakes hands with Janice Hume as Kent Middleton looks on.
Janice Hume talks with Don E. Carter at the Carter Symposium during the Grady centennial celebration April 16, 2015.

“I am pleased—and I know Carolyn would be pleased—that Professor Hume holds the Carter Chair,” Carter said from him home in Sea Island, Georgia. “As Carter Chair and head of the Department of Journalism, she will be able to focus the resources of the chair and the Carter Endowment to advance journalism excellence as Carolyn and I envisioned.  It’s a good time for journalism at Grady.”

Carolyn Carter (ABJ ’40) was the first full-time female photographer for the Atlanta Constitution before working as a writer and photographer for the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine. She also worked at The Coca-Cola Company as a writer and editor. In retirement, she remained engaged in various civic organizations until her death in 2010.

The Carters, who were married for more than 67 years, met while covering the same story for competing newspapers—Carolyn for the Atlanta Constitution and Don for the Atlanta Journal.

“I’m both thrilled and thankful to be named the Carter Chair,” Hume said. “Don Carter and his late wife Carolyn exemplify journalism excellence. What wonderful role models for aspiring journalists. My goal will be to instill in our students the Carters’ passion for responsible, ethical and courageous journalism—the kind of journalism that makes a difference in our communities and world.”


“My goal will be to instill in our students the Carters’ passion for responsible, ethical and courageous journalism…”

— Janice Hume


“I plan to use this chair to increase experiential opportunities for students and to help faculty with research projects designed to help sustain excellent journalism. We will recognize the best student journalists at Grady, and we will connect them with our industry friends and our amazing alumni to make sure Grady graduates are well prepared to lead in this fast-changing news environment.”

Hume joined Grady College in 2001. She teaches magazine writing, management, and media history. Her research focuses on American journalism history, public memory, and media coverage of death.  Hume received her Ph.D., master’s and bachelor of journalism degrees from the University of Missouri.  Prior to joining UGA, Hume spent twelve years as a newspaper reporter and features editor. She was lifestyle and arts editor at the Mobile Register (Ala.) and she served on the faculty of the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kansas State University. She has authored three books including “Popular Media and the American Revolution.”