Vicki Michaelis receives Association for Women in Sports Media award

Vicki Michaelis, the John Huland Carmical Chair in Sports Journalism & Society and director of the John Huland Carmical Sports Media Institute, is the recipient of the 2022 Ann Miller Service Award by Association for Women in Sports Media. It is presented annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the organization.

Michaelis has worked at Grady College since 2012, and has been the faculty adviser for the AWSM student chapter at the University of Georgia and she regularly participates in conventions as a moderator or panelist.

Before joining UGA, she spent more than two decades as a sports journalist, including at USA Today as the lead Olympics reporter and Denver bureau sportswriter covering professional and college sports. She also was a reporter for The Denver Post and The Palm Beach Post.

“Getting an award named for Ann Miller? Priceless to me,” Michaelis said. “She isn’t just part of AWSM’s foundation. She’s part of its soul. That soul, that community, has meant so much to me and my career — as both a journalist and a professor. I am truly honored.”

Michaelis is a former president and chair of the board who has played a role in several AWSM endeavors. She was a regional coordinator, helping plan and host events in the Denver area, and took on treasurer responsibilities during her time as chair.

“Vicki’s involvement and support of AWSM long after serving on the board embodies what the Ann Miller Service Award is all about,” AWSM president Ashley Colley said. “She has helped so many women at both the student and professional level. I’ve witnessed her contributions on both fronts, working with student chapters and giving advice to many of our members seeking guidance from a veteran woman in this industry. We thank Vicki for always making time to give back to AWSM.”

Established in 2013, AWSM’s service award is named in honor of Ann Miller, a longtime Hawaii-based sports reporter who was the organization’s treasurer for its first 10 years, served as board chair and has attended nearly every convention despite the long travel distance.


Editor’s Note: The above was edited from a feature written by AWSM. An original copy of this feature can be found on the AWSM website.

Vicki Michaelis provides input to students in an outdoor class of Multi-platform Storytelling in Sports in April 2022. (Photo: Sarah E. Freeman)

#ProfilesOfTenacity: Amelia Green

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study?

Grady offered versatility and an environment that was challenging yet welcoming to a new student at the University of Georgia. I felt as though the goals outlined in Grady coursework aligned with my personal career goals and that the Sports Media Certificate would offer me real-world experience in the sports media field. I am so grateful that I pursued my undergraduate education with Grady and will cherish the experience for a lifetime. 

What does the word “tenacity” mean to you?

To me, tenacity means thriving when challenges are presented and offering innovative and creative solutions when new endeavors present themselves as difficult.

What are you passionate about?

I am passionate about presenting the world of sports to viewers and fans in a new and captivating way. Whether it is working for the PGA TOUR as head of event planning, the Nashville Superspeedway as a social media manager, or even the National Olympic Committee as a marketing analyst, ideally, I see myself in a field that allows me to make meaningful contributions to both the media consumers and the athletic organizations. I enjoy telling stories and I enjoy making compelling content, but most importantly I want to make people care about the why in sports. 

What or who has had the biggest impact on your life during your time at UGA?

Professor Finlay had acted as my mentor for the past three years at UGA. He has given me so much advice and is always available when I need to ask a question or simply decompress about school to someone who understands the convoluted times of undergrad.

Green was selected to work as an Associated Press Photojournalist for the 2022 Winter Paralympics in Beijing.
What has been your proudest moment in the past year?

My proudest moment in the past year was being selected to travel to the Beijing Winter Paralympics as an Associated Press Photojournalist. Even though we were not able to go due to COVID-19, the other selected students and myself prepared for months and strengthened our skills to be able to tell stories about the incredible athletes competing in Beijing.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve received from an instructor, mentor or family member?

The best piece of advice I have received while at UGA has been to take risks. During my early years in the Sports Media program, Professor Finlay and Professor Michaelis reminded me that while skill is important, being willing to do any task that is asked of you says a lot about your work ethic and character. I was encouraged to make opportunities where there are none and that stepping out of my comfort zone is what will continue to give me a competitive edge in a very competitive field. I now believe that every success in your personal and professional life comes from taking risks and that is the key to being successful in today’s sports media industry.

Green is an intern for the Clarke Central High School Sports Information Department.
What are you planning to do after graduation?

I find myself striving for an opportunity in the sports media field because of its extensive range, rapid pace and growing influence in today’s society. After graduation, I will be attending Vanderbilt University for a Masters in Marketing to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the evolving, complex and global reach of the sports marketing and media industry.

What is your favorite app or social media channel and why?

Instagram is my favorite social media channel because of my passion for photography. Instagram allows me to follow my favorite photojournalists and photographers around the globe and provides a lot of inspiration when it comes to making engaging photographs and writing stories. 

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I am a licensed pilot and frequently fly rescue missions for Pilots N’ Paws Animal Rescue!

Where is your favorite place on campus and why?

The UGA Intramural Fields is my favorite spot on campus because I can either play in one of the many intramural sports leagues for students, take a relaxing walk around Lake Herrick or read a good book!

 

#ProfilesOfTenacity: Armani Kardar

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study?  

I chose Grady and journalism because I love to talk and tell stories. I love meeting people and learning random information. Journalism has allowed me to be put in spaces and opportunities that I wouldn’t normally be in because I have to tell the story.

What does the word “tenacity” mean to you?

Tenacity means to never give up. Nobody can truly stop you from being successful other than yourself. It means to bet on yourself every time regardless of your confidence in your abilities.

What or who has had the biggest impact on your life during your time at UGA?

Professor Carlo Finlay marked a pivotal moment in my development as a man and journalist. I was interested in the Sports Media program as a sophomore but opted not to apply out of the belief that I wasn’t good enough to be accepted. My Junior year a friend of mine, Tylar Norman (Grady and Sports Media Alum),  told me that Professor Finlay asked about me and wondered why I had not applied to the Sports Media program because he felt like I would be a good fit. It shocked me because while I didn’t believe in myself, someone else did. It made me realize I held myself back out of fear of failure and changed my outlook on life. I eventually went on to join the Sports Media program as a senior and decided to stay an extra year at UGA to complete it.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve received from an instructor, mentor or family member?

The best advice I’ve received is from my fraternity advisor Dr. Dennis Humphrey. He always uses old and obscure adages and the one that stuck with me the most is: “The race is not given to the swift, but to those who endure.” Which essentially means that it is better to finish at your own pace rather than placing a timetable on accomplishments based on others.

Kardar, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha, hosted the Greek NPHC Step Show in 2021. (Photo: submitted)
Who is your professional hero?

My professional hero is Stephen A. Smith because of how he went from being a beat reporter in Philadelphia to the biggest name in sports show business. I also appreciate how he is able to be himself on television without being stereotyped or ridiculed.

What are you planning to do after graduation?

I plan to work in sports media as a career. 

What is your favorite app or social media channel and why?

I love to use Twitter because of its versatility. It provides news, jokes, updates and a platform to share your creativity with others.

What would people be surprised to know about you? 

I don’t learn very well in classroom settings and most of my skills are self taught. I really enjoy learning new things.

Where is your favorite place on campus and why?

My favorite place on campus is North Campus because of how beautiful it looks and how close it is to downtown.

What are you passionate about?

I am passionate about mentoring young black men in hopes of instilling the confidence I once lacked in them at an early age. It is important to invest in our youth because they are the future and need to know that their potential is truly limitless.

 

#ProfilesOfTenacity: DonA Traylor-Askew

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study?

I chose to study journalism because I developed a love for storytelling while in grade school. I love talking to people and getting to know more about what makes them who they are. I also love sports and how they bring people together. The idea that I could combine the two and pursue a career in sports journalism seemed like a dream. I knew Grady had a great program and reputation for successful journalists. In addition, I knew the Sports Media Certificate program would help me to best position myself for a fulfilling career.

What does the word “tenacity” mean to you?

Tenacity means pushing through whatever comes your way and never giving up. It means setting your mind on a goal and doing whatever it takes to reach it no matter what situations arise in life that could stand in your way. Simply put, it means unrivaled determination.

What is your most memorable Grady experience?

In my Fall 2021 sports broadcast class, I was the producer of our last show of the year. When I first learned I would have that task, I was so nervous. It was my job to get everyonethe anchor, analysts, feature reporter, and graphics producer, etc.all on the same page. It was the first time I had ever produced a show, but I created a new structure for the show. My classmates and I came together and pulled it off with my new plans being implemented almost seamlessly. I was very proud of myself and although I had never considered pursuing a position as a producer, this experience changed me. Now I really feel like I could do this in a professional setting.

What or who has had the biggest impact on your life during your time at UGA?

The sports media program has had the biggest impact of my life during my time at UGA. I arrived here hoping to begin building a foundation for a career in sports media, but it was really just an idea. It has only been through the experiences in this program that I have truly started to realize that I can be successful in the field. Each class and the challenges I’ve faced in them have allowed me to learn new skills that will not only be applicable in the workplace but could also give me an edge over my competition early on when starting in the industry.

Traylor interviewing a trainer on Dooley Field
Traylor-Askew interviews University of Kentucky Football strength and conditioning coach Rafael Horton.
What is the best piece of advice you’ve received from an instructor, mentor or family member?

I have two great pieces of advice from Professor Vicki Michaelis that I try to keep in mind with all that I do professionally. The first is “Don’t let perfection get in the way of done.” This advice has helped me to stay out of my own way when it comes to being a perfectionist. Instead of trying to find some cute way to dress up a graphic or some fun phrase to add to a sideline hit, it’s always best at the end of the day to deliver the truth of the information in a clear and concise format, and to worry about the additives later. And the second is “If you know what you don’t know, you’ll be fine.” As long as I remain aware of the areas where I can improve, I will always be working to better myself and therefore better position myself for the future.

What are you planning to do after graduation?

I hope to begin working in social media production for an NFL or NBA team in Los Angeles, Phoenix or Atlanta. I could also see myself working in sports broadcasting in some form, either as an anchor or producer.

What is your favorite app or social media channel and why?
Traylor on the Newsource set
Traylor-Askew is an active volunteer and manager for Grady Newsource.

TikTok. It is such an informal platform that even professional TikTok accounts are able to create a silly atmosphere for consumers. When NFL and NBA teams can use this form of media to make jokes about one another and it’s not only acceptable, but to be expected, I think it is great.

Where is your favorite place on campus and why?

My favorite place on campus is Sanford Stadium. I have been able to make so many great memories there with the new friends that I’ve made during my time at UGA. The atmosphere is phenomenal. And as a major sports fan, I didn’t miss a home game all year and I don’t plan to miss one next year either.

Who is your professional hero?

I would consider Maria Taylor to be a professional hero of mine. She also attended Grady and is having a very successful career in sports broadcasting. She is one of the younger successful Black sports broadcasters that I feel has recently blazed a trail for women like me who could follow in her footsteps before creating my own path.

What has been your proudest moment in the past year?

I was part of a small team of student reporters who worked to create “The First Five,” a documentary about the five black men who integrated the UGA football team in 1971. I didn’t realize how much work would go into the project when we first started, and I had some self doubt in the beginning because I’d never done anything like it before. However, I worked hard to give each subject a true voice when I finished my portion of the piece and when I saw what it added to the overall story, it was one of the proudest moments of my life.

 

#ProfilesOfTenacity: Palmer Thombs

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study?  

As an out of state student, Grady is what drew me to come to Georgia. I knew I wanted to study journalism in college, and I knew that Grady was the place I wanted to do it. So, for me, choosing Grady happened long before I applied to the college. It happened when I applied to the university because I saw the people that have come out of here and the opportunities students have while here as second to none. 

Who is your professional hero? 

I’ve always enjoyed the work of Adam Lucas, a writer for the University of North Carolina and its athletics program. I grew up reading Lucas’ work, specifically relating to UNC basketball, and admired the way he is able to relate to readers by using his voice. This is something that I have always tried to do too, not let the facts block out my voice, thus allowing the reader to get to know both me and the story I’m reporting. 

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I think a lot of people would be surprised to know about my passion for writing. That doesn’t come as a surprise to anybody in Grady, or anybody that’s gotten to know me well enough, but it’s just not common that you see somebody with a desire to go into journalism these days. It’s something that makes me different from most of my best friends, and something that I think people would be surprised to know about me. I’m passionate about it, knew that and decided to pursue that professionally. 

What are you passionate about? 

I would say that I am passionate about sharing stories. Whether that is the story of an individual, a team, a community, a game or anything else, I thoroughly enjoy finding the right way to convey my experiences to others. 

What or who has had the biggest impact on your life during your time at UGA?  

The Grady Sports Media program has probably had the biggest impact on my life during my time at Georgia, specifically professor Carlo Finlay. I came into the program already having some experience in the field of sports media, however I’ve still been able to grow exponentially. I actually remember meeting with Professor Finlay and talking about the sports media certificate during a visit to Georgia when I was in high school, so his impact goes beyond just my days in Athens. 

What is an example of a time you used your studies and skills in a real-world experience?  

While every day on the job uses the skills that I’ve learned through my studies, I think the biggest example of me using them came during the summer of 2020 when I worked as a communications intern for the Carolinas Golf Association. In fact, it was myself and two other Grady students and graduates tag-teaming communications, so we all used skills learned through our time here. However, skills like photography, social media and writing absolutely came in handy in this fast paced, real world work experience, and I can thank Grady for that knowledge.

What are you planning to do after graduation?  

I have accepted, and actually already started, a full-time job with On3 Sports as their team beat writer for their Georgia site. I will be living in Athens and covering the Dawgs. This is an exciting opportunity for me to get in on the ground floor of a promising new sports media outlet and stay connected with a school that I love so much.

Palmer participated in the Sports Media Certificate, where he got to interview players, coaches and other sports professionals.
What is your favorite app or social media channel and why? 

I would say that Twitter is probably my favorite app and social media because it’s the quickest and easiest way to stay up to date with the happenings of this fast-paced world. 

Where is your favorite place on campus and why? 

My favorite place on campus would be Sanford Stadium because I feel at home there. Not only is it a place where I do my work, but over the years it is also a place where I’ve gotten to spend so much quality time with my friends in the stands. There’s really nothing like a Saturday in Sanford. 

What has been your proudest moment in the past year? 

My proudest moment in the last year would have to be getting and accepting my full-time job offer with On3 Sports to cover Georgia athletics. It’s something that I have been working toward for a long time, a full-time opportunity in this field, and a place that I feel certain I wouldn’t have ended up in had it not been for coming to Georgia.   

#ProfilesOfTenacity: Henry Queen

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study? 

The Grady Sports Media program initially attracted me to UGA. Growing up an Auburn fan, I might not have given UGA a second thought without it. I remember going on a tour with assistant director Carlo Finlay and being blown away. He recommended I join The Red & Black my freshman year, and the rest is history.   

What does the word “tenacity” mean to you? 

Keeping sane during the last year is tenacious in and of itself. We’ve endured a lot, but that doesn’t mean we should ever let go of hope, gratitude and empathy. To me, tenacity means holding onto those qualities even when it’s most difficult. 

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I’m a childhood cancer survivor!

What are you passionate about?

I’m passionate about learning new things and restoring shared narratives within our local communities. I want to tell stories that unite more than divide. Sports are an incredible opportunity for that. They’ve been a lifelong passion of mine, but for reasons that have changed. As a kid, I memorized baseball statistics and idolized the game’s best players. Now I see sports (along with music) as one of the best ways for people to connect with strangers. It’s rare for that many people to gather as one, especially in our sprawling, car-dependent cities. Coming out of the pandemic, I expect people to be hungry for that connection.

What is your most memorable Grady experience?

Getting sick on the way to Super Bowl Media Day. I’m prone to motion sickness, and the ride to Atlanta with my classmates wasn’t fun. But I ended up doing the interviews, making photos and writing two stories in time for that afternoon’s deadline.

What is your favorite app or social media channel?

Twitter, but only because I can curate my own feed. That power scares me. 

What has been your proudest moment in the past year?

When two people independently took my Twitter recommendation and ate at Groove Burgers on the same day. I’m always happy to spread the good word.

What or who has had the biggest impact on your life during your time at UGA?

My friends. Aside from the great times and personal memories we’ve shared, they’ve also meant a ton to me professionally. My storytelling skills were drastically improved by interacting with people outside the journalism bubble.      

Queen interviewed football players as a part of the Super Bowl LIII Media Day. (Photo courtesy of Henry Queen).
Who is your professional hero?

I have so many. Some of my favorite sports journalists include Mirin Fader, Wright Thompson, Howard Bryant and Joe Posnanski. My favorite magazine journalists are Ed Yong, Tom Junod and Chris Jones, although he is now a screenwriter. But that brings up a good point: I admire storytellers of all mediums. I take inspiration from filmmakers, podcasters, YouTubers and songwriters. There is so much good stuff out there.  

What is the best piece of advice you’ve received from an instructor, mentor or family member?

My mom told me recently that nothing is permanent. I think that’s an important lesson from the pandemic and something to keep in mind going forward. Savor everything you have while you have it.  

Where is your favorite place on campus?

I’m going to be cliché and say North Campus. It’s so beautiful, especially this time of year. 

#ProfilesOfTenacity: Tylar Norman

Tylar was recently awarded $1,000 from the Taylor Maggiore Fund. Read the full profile here.

What are you passionate about?

One thing that I am really passionate about is telling the stories and increasing visibility in the media for those in underrepresented groups, such as minorities and women. As a Black woman, I often reflect on how important it is to have representation because I did not see a lot of that growing up. Seeing other women, especially minority women, work in a field that was not very diverse a few decades ago always reminds me to keep going and to remember to make more room at the table for other women. Going into the media field, I recognize the need to continue to uplift and advocate for the voices of minorities, make others more aware of the role we play in society and give back to these groups that have shaped my identity.

What would people be surprised to know about you?

I have had my own YouTube channel for about two years!

Why did you choose Grady and your course of study?

I still remember the first time I toured Grady back in April of 2017. I got to see the Newsource studio, hear about the Grady Sports Media program and walk through the halls that would come to shape a big part of my experience as a student at UGA. I chose Grady because the college immediately felt like home before I even got my official acceptance letter. I came into UGA wanting to major in journalism and thinking that I wanted to work in the sports media field. However, I had no idea what direction to go in at that time. Grady College and the Grady Sports Media program have offered me so many opportunities and real world experiences over the past four years that have helped me to find my niche within the journalism field.

What has been your proudest moment in the past year?

Having the opportunity to interview and moderate a conversation with Monica Pearson, the first woman and first minority to anchor the daily evening news in Atlanta, for UGA Grady students.

What does the word “tenacity” mean to you?

When I think of tenacity, I think of the word determination. It is continuing to be strong, to persist and to keep moving forward no matter what life throws your way. It is to not worry about the past or the future, because you know that you are strong in the present and have the confidence to handle the challenges and difficulties that you may face everyday.

Where is your favorite place on campus?

The Founder’s Garden in North Campus

What are you planning to do after graduating? What is your dream job?

Upon graduation, I want to obtain more internship experience working in sports media before I begin applying to jobs. Although I am very open to any opportunity in this field, my dream job is to one day work as a digital content creator for a team or for a sports network, as well as helping to run that team’s social media and help with digital marketing initiatives.

Who is your professional hero?

It’s a tie between Maria Taylor and Joy Taylor

What is the best piece of advice you’ve received from an instructor/mentor/family member?

My mom always tells me that I am capable of doing anything that I have my mind set on. This advice really helped to shape my thought process on the advice that I have further received throughout my college career: Apply for everything, even if you don’t think you are qualified. Getting out of my comfort zone and thinking on my mom’s advice that I am capable always helps me to keep pushing forward.

What is your favorite app or social media channel?

TikTok can always put a smile on my face, but I love Instagram for content creation as well.

Sports media student Tylar Norman wins first award from Taylor Maggiore Fund

Tylar Norman, a senior graduating in May 2021, will receive the first $1,000 award from the Taylor Maggiore Fund at the University of Georgia. Available to students enrolled in the sports media undergraduate certificate program, the fund helps promote the advancement of women in the sports media industry.

Norman takes photos while covering Morgan County athletics.

A panel of alumni and faculty members selected Norman for her work with organizations on and off-campus and her passion for encouraging women in sports media, especially women of color.

“I hope to one day start my own mentorship organization for women in the sports media field,” she wrote in her application, “to ensure that we are all uplifting each other and increasing the inclusion of women in this field.”

The current president of UGA’s chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists, Norman has worked as a communications intern with the Atlanta Dream and in media relations for the U.S. Olympic Trials.

“The Grady Sports Media program has been the steppingstone to the real-world experience that I’ve had,” Norman said.

After graduation, she plans to look for opportunities that lead to her goal of one day becoming a social media producer in the NBA.

Norman, a journalism major with minors in Spanish and sport management, has assisted in the production of Grady Newsource as a technical manager. She also runs her own freelance photography business.

Taylor Maggiore (AB ’19) addresses the undergraduate commencement ceremony at the University of Georgia on December 13, 2019. Maggiore has created the Taylor Maggiore Scholarship in the Grady Sports Media undergraduate certificate program. (Photo: Dorothy Kozlowski (ABJ ’10)/UGA Marketing & Communications)

“Through all the experiences she has sought and excelled at during her college years, Tylar already is making her mark in sports media,” said Vicki Michaelis, John Huland Carmical Chair in Sports Journalism & Society. “I have no doubt she is and will be a role model for others who want to work in this industry. We’re thrilled for Tylar, and we’re so grateful to Taylor for paying it forward in this way.”

Taylor Maggiore, who graduated in December 2019 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a sports media certificate, began work last January as a stage manager for ESPN in Bristol, Conn. She established the fund within months of graduating to help students “with living accommodations during an internship, books, business casual and professional wardrobe, interview, equipment, or anything else that is needed.”

To read more about the Taylor Maggiore Fund, check out this story.

Sports media students write stories for U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum

Students in the Sports Media Certificate program profiled athletes from the 1980 U.S. Olympic team, including Bart Conner (gymnastics), Edwin Moses (track and field) and Megan Neyer (diving) in stories published to the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Digital Museum.

The profiles were part of the curriculum in the spring 2020 section of “Multiplatform Storytelling for Sports.” The stories were published for the 40th anniversary of the U.S. boycott of the Moscow 1980 Games.

Zach Miles profiled Isiah Thomas, 1980 Olympian basketball player.

Zach Miles, one of the profile authors, researched, conducted interviews and wrote about Basketball Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas. Miles impressed the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Digital Museum staff and landed an internship with them over the summer.

“To be able to talk with former athletes and their families while hearing their stories and what representing the United States meant to them truly left me in awe,” said Miles. “It’s so important and valuable for these athletes to be remembered and honored in this way, and I was grateful that I was able to play a role in this by telling their stories.”

Museum communications professionals helped students refine their writing and provided feedback on their stories.

“The Museum is committed to education and working with future generations to instill the Olympic and Paralympic values,” Museum Chief Executive Officer Christopher Liedel said. “We are proud to work with a program with such a strong track record and the University of Georgia. Allowing students to learn about and tell the stories of these incredible athletes is just a terrific opportunity for us.”

The partnership builds on half a decade of coverage by sports media students for the Olympic Games, Olympic Winter Games and Paralympic Games.

For 12 years, Vicki Michaelis, John Huland Carmical Chair in Sports Journalism & Society, was the USA Today lead Olympics reporter. She now teaches students the cultural influence of the Olympic Games as an international athletic showcase and the importance of documenting the athletes who perform on the global stage.

“Finding the stories worth telling is at the core of everything we teach, and, in my mind, no sports event offers up more of those stories than the Olympic and Paralympic Games,” said Michaelis. “They provide seemingly limitless opportunities for our students to hone their storytelling skills, whether they’re covering the Games as they happen or peeling back the pages of history.”

Sports media students have covered the 2016 and 2018 Olympic Games as credentialed journalists. A team of the college’s sports media and visual journalism students also covered the 2016 Paralympic Games in Brazil, with their stories and photos distributed globally by The Associated Press. Thanks to a gift from the John Huland Carmical Foundation, the AP partnership will continue at the Paralympic Games in Tokyo next summer.

You can read the profiles of the following 1980 U.S. Olympians:

Gymnast Bart Conner
Kayaker Greg Barton
Swimmer Rowdy Gaines
Wrestler Lee Kemp
Track and field athlete Edwin Moses
Diver Megan Neyer
Basketball player Jill Rankin Schneider
Field hockey player Julie Staver
Basketball player Isiah Thomas

Learn more about the partnership in this release from the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Museum.

2019 alumna creates scholarship for Grady Sports Media

Not long after the University of Georgia paused instruction to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, the Grady Sports Media undergraduate certificate program got an unexpected bit of good news.

Alumna Taylor Maggiore, who had just graduated in December, wanted to create a scholarship to further the advancement of women in the tumultuous professional world of sports media.

“The certificate gave me the tools and skills to land my dream job,” wrote Maggiore in an e-mail to Vicki Michaelis, director of the program. “I think the least I could do is help another woman in our field by easing some financial burdens that come with it.”

Maggiore started in January as a stage manager for ESPN in Bristol, Conn. Thanks to her generosity and an employee matching donation from ESPN, the first Taylor Maggiore Scholar will be announced in Fall 2020.

“Taylor’s passion and talent for sports broadcasting energized all of us while she was a Grady Sports student. I’m thrilled and so grateful she’s reaching back to give our current and future students a helping hand and infusion of that energy,” said Michaelis, the John Huland Carmical Professor of Sports Journalism and Society in the Grady College.

Maggiore (far left) worked with four other Grady alumnae last spring at ESPN. Others included Ann Drinkard (ABJ ’16), Caroline McLeod (AB ’19) and Sarah Buck (AB ’18).

Maggiore got involved with Grady Sports as a first-year student producing high school football games and worked a variety of events for Daktronics and the SEC Network during her time on campus. She mentored Cedar Shoals High School students through the UGA-Grady High School Sports Broadcast Program, an initiative aimed at supporting the recruitment of underrepresented, underserved and first-generation students to UGA. She also was a UGA orientation leader and was named a Cox Institute Levin Leader by the Department of Journalism. She was the student speaker for the undergraduate commencement ceremony in December 2019.

“We know that as Bulldogs, we will be productive and educated members of society,” Maggiore said in her speech in Stegeman Coliseum. “We will shatter glass ceilings and be kind to one another. We will give others opportunities because we’re all sitting here today because someone took a chance on us.”

Grady Sports Media will continue raising funds to sustain the scholarship and Maggiore’s legacy in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. If you are interested in contributing to the fund, please contact Welch Suggs, associate director of Grady Sports Media, at wsuggs@uga.edu or 706-363-0752.