Cox Institute names its 2021 SABEW Fellows

Ten journalism students were selected during the Fall semester as Cox-SABEW Fellows, a financial journalism training program offered through the University of Georgia’s Cox Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership in partnership with the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW).

The Cox-SABEW Fellows for 2021 are: Michael Banks, Ansleigh Edwards, Thomas Ehlers, Jessica Green, Kate Hester, Carah Jones, Jamie Miller, Emily Petraglia, Spencer Pipkin and Haley Roberson.

The Cox-SABEW Fellowships were created to recognize students who have engaged in financial journalism and business education through class assignments, student media and professional internships, or for those looking to launch their financial journalism journey, said Dr. Keith Herndon, executive director of the Cox Institute.

Herndon, a former business journalist, said the objectives of the program are to explain financial journalism and introduce students to career opportunities in the field.

“Through this program I have learned not only some of the basics of business . . ., but also how to write about business in a way that is easy to understand and shows how it touches our everyday lives,” said Kate Hester, who completed her bachelor’s degree in journalism and is now in her first year of a master’s program.

The 2021 Fellows are participating in the College Connect program, a personal finance writing workshop, which will pay them for producing and publishing personal finance stories for the SABEW website. SABEW operates the College Connect program through a sponsorship from the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

Additionally, the Fellows have engaged in virtual discussion sessions with previous students in the program who are now professional financial journalists. The Fellows also attended SABEW’s virtual conference held this year October 12-14.

Hester said the networking events gave her and the other fellows opportunities “to talk with business journalists and learn more about the field.”

This year’s group marks the ninth year of the Cox-SABEW Fellowships. The program started in 2013 and has recognized 53 participants including this year’s fellows.

“SABEW continues to be one of our premier training partners and we are so appreciative of its support along with the financial backing from NEFE,” said Herndon. “The news industry faces many headwinds, but success by any measure requires training our next generation. This important industry-academic partnership is vital to that mission.”

Cox Institute adds new directors, initiatives to benefit students and industry

A new organizational and leadership structure will expand the training mission of the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership.

The Cox Institute, which operates as a unit of the Journalism Department at the University of Georgia’s College of Journalism and Mass Communication, will offer expanded skills development and training opportunities programs for students and professionals through the newly-restructured Journalism Innovation Lab and Journalism Writing Lab.

The Cox Institute’s Journalism Innovation Lab will assume operation of the Digital Natives program, which brings UGA journalism students with digital news expertise into Georgia newsrooms to help local journalists and news organizations accomplish specific digital goals.  This program was launched by Dr. Amanda Bright, a member of the journalism faculty, who will continue to manage this project along with other digital innovation initiatives to develop the products, practices and people of journalism’s future in a new role as Director of the Journalism Innovation Lab.

“I’m thrilled to be able to create a space where students and professionals can collaborate and innovate toward the next iteration of journalism,” Bright said. “The Journalism Innovation Lab will be committed to encouraging students to think boldly about where our industry should go next, while meeting specific needs in the field to serve our audiences and a functioning democracy.”

The Cox Institute’s Journalism Writing Lab will expand its scope by operating the Covering Poverty project, which was relaunched earlier this year by students funded through a Scripps Howard Foundation grant. This fall, the project will recruit a new group of students and alumni to work in partnership with The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and The Athens Banner-Herald.  Lori Johnston (ABJ ’95, MFA ’17), a lecturer in the Journalism Department who oversaw the relaunch of Covering Poverty, will become Director of the Journalism Writing Lab. She will continue to manage the Covering Poverty project along with other content initiatives.

“I am thankful to the Cox Institute for being forward-thinking and for the relationships we have established with these important media outlets, and others to come,” Johnston said. “I look forward to guiding students as they report, write and produce meaningful stories about issues, people and places. They will deepen their reporting abilities and delve into the craft of storytelling and service journalism to help newsrooms tell these stories now, and then take those newfound skills into their careers.”

In addition to the new structure and projects housed in the Journalism Innovation Lab and the Journalism Writing Lab, the Cox Institute will continue to provide students with leadership training opportunities through initiatives such as the Levin Leaders Program and skills development opportunities through a variety of fellowship programs.

“We are enhancing the core of what the Cox Institute has built over three decades to make our programs an even more integral part of the journalism education our students receive,” said Dr. Keith Herndon (ABJ ’82), whose title will change from director to executive director of the Cox Institute as part of the new leadership structure. “Adding two respected colleagues in Amanda Bright and Lori Johnston to our leadership is a win for the Cox Institute and for the students we serve.”

The Cox Institute was established in 1990 by the late Conrad Fink, a legendary journalism professor, as the Cox Institute for Newspaper Management Studies. Its current name was adopted in 2014 to reflect the news media’s digital transformation. The Institute honors the late James M. Cox Jr., who headed Cox Enterprises and Cox Broadcasting Corporation from 1957 until 1974. Its primary funding is from the Jim Cox Jr. Foundation.

UGA journalism student awarded internship funded by Scripps Howard Foundation

Editor’s Note: This feature was originally posted on the Cox Institute website.

Janelle Ward, a rising senior at the University of Georgia, will intern this summer with the Athens Banner-Herald as part of a program funded by the Scripps Howard Foundation.

The internship will be administered by the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership at the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“I am truly honored and humbled to have been selected for this reputable internship and am elated to spend this summer improving my craft in the Athens Banner-Herald newsroom,” Ward said. “I’m thankful to the Scripps Howard Foundation, the Banner-Herald, the Cox Institute and my professors and mentors at Grady College for making all of this possible.”

Ward, who is pursuing dual undergraduate degrees in journalism and history, is expected to graduate in May 2022. She has worked as a reporter for The Red & Black producing general news and stories on topics including business and the arts. Her role in the spring 2021 semester as the independent student newspaper’s race reporter included event coverage and historical pieces. She has also served as the newspaper’s calendar editor. Ward was also the Charlayne Hunter-Gault intern at Chess and Community where she created material for the non-profit organization’s website and newsletter.

Caitlyn Stroh-Page (ABJ ’15), editor of the Athens Banner-Herald, said the newspaper is honored to host Ward this summer as part of the Cox Institute’s Journalism Innovation Lab program.

“Her storytelling, enhanced by her skills and passion, will no doubt be a service to the community,” said Stroh-Page.

The Scripps Howard Foundation’s sponsorship of the internship continues a relationship began last year when the foundation provided seed funding for the Cox Institute to relaunch and expand the college’s Covering Poverty initiative, which is also part of the Journalism Innovation Lab.

Keith Herndon, director of the Cox Institute, said Ward’s internship is another example of how the Journalism Innovation Lab works with industry partners to provide students with experiential learning opportunities.  He said more students will work in the lab this fall under the direction of Lori Johnston, a journalism lecturer. Their work will be published in the Athens Banner-Herald and OnlineAthens.com as part of the Covering Poverty project.

Stroh-Page said the newspaper is committed to providing training opportunities for student journalists through the Covering Poverty initiative.

“We hope to tackle some of the important issues facing the Athens area through a continuing partnership with the bright students and UGA faculty at the Cox Institute,” Stroh-Page said.

Cox Institute Journalism Innovation Lab relaunches online poverty reporting toolkit

Community, local and national journalists can turn to Covering Poverty for tips, tutorials, resources and inspiration to write and report on people and poverty-related matters.

The University of Georgia Journalism Innovation Lab, a student project of the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership, relaunched the updated website at a new url — coveringpoverty.uga.edu — in late March.

A $7,500 grant from the Scripps Howard Foundation funded the plans to continue a Covering Poverty online initiative that began more than a decade ago.

A team of six journalism students under the direction of Lori Johnston (ABJ ’95, MFA ’17), a lecturer in the Department of Journalism, redesigned the site with a clean, modern layout and updated content, visuals and graphics.

The new stories, which feature multimedia storytelling, include guidance on word choice when reporting on inequality, tips for writing across difference and what to learn from poverty coverage during the pandemic.

Journalists need resources and tools to cover this topic, especially as the pandemic, 2020 election and social issues showed the importance of telling the stories accurately and with empathy. Visitors to the site will accumulate what they need to cover poverty now and in the future.

“Newsrooms have covered poverty, but now there’s more heightened awareness of language to describe people who are experiencing poverty and making sure that we cover it in a way that do not bring in assumptions or misconceptions,” Johnston said. “The vision is that this site is a go-to place for journalists, whether they’re working for a local newspaper or a national media outlet, when they face questions about how to cover poverty, seek examples or want to brainstorm story ideas.”

The site’s updated beat guides on health care, education, housing, and crime and mass incarceration provide questions to ask and spotlight databases, academic papers and studies, and institutions, centers and organizations that research the issues.

The team of students, who were nominated by journalism faculty and received Cox Innovation Fellowship scholarships for their participation in the program, included:

• Lillie Beck
• Kelsey Coffey
• Taylor Gerlach
• Sofia Gratas
• Shania Shelton
• Savannah Ware

Students said the lab’s empowering learning environment showed them how to create solutions-based, diverse reporting about poverty.

“I’ve learned so much about the importance of research and honest reporting. In my future career, I definitely will take the skills I’ve learned through this project to become a journalist who knows how to look between the lines and do the necessary research to tell important stories,” said Shelton, who will graduate in 2021.

Students curated award-winning reporting and data journalism projects as well as resources, such as books, podcasts and documentaries, to provide guidance and inspiration for reporters, visual journalists and editors who visit the site.

“I’ve been honored to help curate resources to help guide other journalists in making ethical decisions regarding a sensitive topic and encourage more inclusive, tactful coverage of our communities near and far,” said Gerlach, who will graduate in spring 2021.

The team discussed in conversations with Johnston and Dr. Keith Herndon, director of the Cox Institute, the importance of adding context in developing the online resource kit for journalists.

“Context allows us to see the dimensions of a story and not just what’s on the surface,” said Coffey, who graduated in fall 2020. “Working on this project has been one of my favorite experiences at the Grady College, and I’m looking forward to using some of the tools I learned in my future career.”

Since its inception in 2009, Covering Poverty has provided reporting resources to more than 500 journalists annually. The original Covering Poverty project was created with a grant awarded in 2008 by the University of Georgia Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach, sponsored by the UGA Research Foundation.

John Greenman, professor of journalism, emeritus, and Diane Murray, director of alumni relations and outreach, directed the program. Upon Greenman’s retirement in 2015, Murray continued to direct the program. Carolyn Crist (ABJ 09, MA ’14) started with the project as an undergraduate honors student and later was administrator of the website.

The 2021 Levin Leaders receive their Cox Institute leadership medals

The James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership has recognized its 2021 class of Levin Leaders by presenting the aspiring media leaders with their Leadership Medals.

The Levin Leaders were selected for the program from a pool of faculty nominations based on their commitment to professional development through work in student media, internships and other student activities. The 2021 Levin Leaders are Shaelyn Carroll, Willie Daniely, Alex English, Olivia Mead, Mackenzie Miles, Zachary Miles, Tylar Norman, Laura Nwogu, Caroline Odom, Samantha Perez, Kyra Posey, Jack Sadighian, Augusta Stone and Lora Yordanova.

The students received their medals during a private, socially-distanced dinner on March 15 at the Center for Continuing Education. Grady College Dean Charles Davis attended to recognize the accomplishments of these top journalism students.

“You represent the best of us,” Davis said, reflecting on the competitive selection process. “We want you to know how important you are to the college.”

The Cox Institute also announced the winners of several Journalism Department scholarships during the dinner. Augusta Stone and Lora Yordanova were awarded Conrad C. Fink Scholarships, which are presented annually in memory of the late journalism professor who founded the Cox Institute. Jack Sadighian received the Todd M. Bauer Memorial Award, which was established by the Bauer family to honor their son by helping young journalists establish themselves in their early careers. The Cox Institute also announced Savannah Sicurella, a 2020 Levin Leader, as this year’s recipient of the Barry Hollander Award, which was established by former students in memory of the late journalism professor known for his steadfast defense of open meetings and records.

The students participating in the leadership program met weekly for eight weeks with Dr. Keith Herndon, director of the Cox Institute. The sessions, held socially distanced in the large Studio 100 or over Zoom, featured student discussions about leadership principles drawn from the “Your Leadership Edge” book published by the Kansas Leadership Center.

“These students have been through a lot over the past year and have demonstrated enormous resilience,” Herndon said. “We wanted our program this year to be encouraging while also challenging them to be introspective, empathetic and adaptable as they prepare for immense change in the coming decade.”

Shaelyn Carroll said the program made her think about the importance of embracing change, especially in the media industry, and also said it gave her new perspectives on the meaning of leadership.

“This program made me think of leadership as a choice rather than an appointed position; it is something you can choose to do every single day,” said Carroll.

The 2021 cohort also indicated the training’s emphasis on personal integrity and acting empathetically resonated with them.

“This program made me think of leadership as a way to live,” said Lora Yordanova. “It’s about living everyday with integrity, courage, empathy and vision even when no one is watching.”

Samantha Perez described leadership as “an opportunity to collaborate,” while Laura Nwogu said it means “amplifying the voices of others and giving them a stage to be leaders themselves.”

Since its inception nine years ago, the Cox Institute’s leadership training program has taught 127 of Grady’s best journalism students about leadership principles. The program was renamed the Levin Leaders Initiative in 2019 to reflect the generous support provided by Adam Levin, his wife Heather McDowell, and the Philip and Janice Levin Foundation. The Levin family’s support provides for curriculum development, training materials and other expenses of running the program. Levin is a nationally recognized expert on cyber security, privacy, identity theft, fraud, and personal finance. He was chairman and founder of CyberScout and was co-founder of Credit.com. He authored the book, “Swiped: How to Protect Yourself in a World Full of Scammers, Phishers, and Identity Thieves.”

Cox Institute Announces its Cox-SABEW Fellows for 2020

Twelve journalism students were selected during the Fall semester as Cox-SABEW Fellows, a financial journalism training program offered through the University of Georgia’s James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership in partnership with the Society for Advancing Business Editing and Writing (SABEW).

The Cox-SABEW Fellows for 2020 are: Alexis Brock, Allison Caso, Emily Garcia, Jessica Green,  Jayla Johnson, Caroline Kurzawa, Katherine Lewis, Jamie Miller, Caroline Odom, Aleeza Rasheed, Savannah Sicurella and Tyler Wilkins.

The Cox-SABEW Fellowships were created to recognize students who have engaged in financial journalism and business education through class assignments, student media and professional internships, or for those looking to launch their financial journalism journey, said Dr. Keith Herndon, director of the Cox Institute.

“Before I served as a Cox-SABEW fellow, the idea of covering news from within the business and financial sectors felt daunting,” said Savannah Sicurella.

Herndon, a former business journalist, said the objectives of the program are to explain financial journalism and introduce students to career opportunities in the field.

“Writing for the SABEW website helped me realize that financial journalism is not just stocks and bonds. It’s merely reporting on issues that affect the livelihood of others,” Sicurella said.

“This serves the fundamental goal of journalism — delivering information on complex issues to an audience in a manner that is accessible and comprehensible — and it is why I am drawn to this avenue in the first place.”

The 2020 Fellows are participating in the College Connect program, a personal finance writing workshop, which will pay them for producing and publishing personal finance stories for the SABEW website. SABEW operates the College Connect program through a sponsorship of the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE).

Additionally, the Fellows are participating in virtual networking sessions with previous students in the program who are now professional financial journalists.  The Fellows also will attend SABEW’s virtual conference held this year November 17-20.

This year’s group marks the eighth year of the Cox-SABEW Fellowships. The program started in 2013 and has recognized 43 participants.

“We are so appreciative of SABEW’s willingness to engage with our students and of the financial support provided by NEFE,” said Herndon. “This is a great example of an industry-academic partnership helping to prepare the next generation of journalists.”

The Red & Black wins 2020 Betty Gage Holland Award

The Red & Black, an independent student news organization covering The University of Georgia, is the 2020 winner of the Betty Gage Holland Award for excellence in college journalism.

The award annually recognizes the best in college journalism by highlighting work that seeks to protect the integrity of public dialogue on America’s college campuses. The Holland Award is administered by the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership at the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Graphic courtesy of The Red & Black.

The Red & Black was chosen as this year’s winner for its reporting on an embezzlement scandal that exposed a complete failure of institutional control in the University of Georgia’s Greek Life Office. The Red & Black was the first to break the story of how an employee’s suicide was the aftermath of her theft of $1.3 million over 10 years and how the lack of oversight from her supervisors allowed the crime to go undetected for so long.

In presenting the award, the Cox Institute said without the diligent reporting of The Red & Black, which included extensive use of documents obtained through an open records request filed under the Freedom of Information Act, many of the facts of this case would have been unknown to the University community.

“Despite the unfortunate and concerning circumstances of what happened, I was proud of our team for uncovering gross financial malfeasance and the lack of oversight that allowed it to occur, including details that the university would have otherwise kept under wraps,” said Hunter Riggall, who was news editor when the articles were published.  Riggall, now a reporter at the LaGrange Daily News, said he had covered the initial suicide that happened in the Tate parking deck on campus, “which helped us connect the dots later on.”

While the open records request yielded documents necessary for the paper’s detailed reporting, editors Savannah Sicurella and Spencer Donovan also acknowledged their community sources.

“We wouldn’t have been able to tell this story without the help of our readers, who led us from start to finish with tips,” said Donovan, who was city news editor. Sicurella, who was campus news editor, described the work as an example of crowdsourced journalism. “We were originally tipped off by a reader, trusted the word of mouth of our peers in Greek Life, gathered messages (and) emails from faculty and relied on our past police reporting to fill in the blanks,” she said.

Collin Huguley served as editor-in-chief. (photo: Julian Alexander, courtesy of The Red & Black.)

Collin Huguley, then the paper’s editor-in-chief, recalled working with the editors on these stories as his “proudest moments.”  Huguley, now a reporter with the Charlotte Business Journal, said “their tireless pursuit of the truth and the decisions we made in approaching a sensitive, tragic story set a new standard for reporting at our publication.”

Earlier this year, the Society of Professional Journalists also recognized The Red and Black with its Mark Excellence Award as the Best All-Around non-daily student newspaper in the country.

“We are delighted to add our Betty Gage Holland award to the growing list of accolades for work done by The Red & Black,” said Dr. Keith Herndon, Director of the Cox Institute. “Capturing two of college journalism’s highest awards in the same year is a testament to the dedicated student journalists who work there. We are so proud of their efforts.”

The Red & Black last won the Betty Gage Holland Award in 2011. More recent winners were The Flor-Ala at the University of North Alabama in 2019, The Sunflower at Wichita State University in 2018 and the College Heights Herald at Western Kentucky University in 2017.

This year’s award carries cash prizes of $1,000 to be shared among the student journalists who produced the work and $1,000 to help the newspaper offset its reporting expenses.

Read an example of The Red & Black’s award-winning coverage. The Red & Black also provided a detailed recap of how the story was reported in an explanation piece found at the bottom of this story.

The Red & Black published a repository of the documents it used in its reporting.

In response to the scandal, UGA changed policies about how funds are handled at student organizations, which The Red & Black reported.

Scripps Howard Foundation awards grant to fund Cox Institute’s reporting project

The Scripps Howard Foundation has awarded a grant to the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership for a poverty reporting initiative.

The grant of $7,500 will fund the Cox Institute’s plans to use reporting on poverty as the topic for its student projects in the Fall 2020 Journalism Innovation Lab.

“The coverage of poverty and underserved communities touches communities and news organizations across the country. This program can provide students with meaningful experiences, lead to excellent journalism, and serve as a model and resource,” said Dr. Battinto L. Batts Jr., the director of journalism strategies with the Scripps Howard Foundation.

Keith Herndon, director of the Cox Institute, explained the funding from the Scripps Howard Foundation provides a new path for continuing a Covering Poverty online initiative that began more than a decade ago.

The work to update content, create original new content and relaunch the Covering Poverty resources will be done by a team of six journalism students under the direction of Lori Johnston, a lecturer in the Department of Journalism.

“I look forward to this tremendous opportunity to engage motivated, creative and talented journalism students who will explore innovative multimedia approaches, newsgathering techniques and storytelling on a meaningful real-world project,” Johnston said. “With the coronavirus pandemic, the 2020 election and social issues, there has never been a better time to equip journalists to report about underserved communities.”

The students will be selected for the Journalism Innovation Lab through faculty nominations early in the Fall semester. The selected students will receive Cox Innovation Fellowship scholarships for their participation in the program.

The original Covering Poverty project launched as a website in 2009. It was created with a grant awarded in 2008 by the University of Georgia Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach, sponsored by the UGA Research Foundation. John Greenman, professor of journalism, emeritus, and Diane Murray, director of alumni relations and outreach, directed the program. Upon Greenman’s retirement in 2015, Murray continued to direct the program. Carolyn Crist (ABJ 09, MA ’14) started with the project as an undergraduate honors student and later was administrator of the website.

Since its inception, Covering Poverty provided reporting resources to more than 500 journalists annually who were covering poverty and related stories for news media organizations ranging from local newspapers to network television.

“We are very appreciative of the Scripps Howard Foundation for recognizing the importance of this resource and for providing the funds needed to continue it in a meaningful way,” Herndon said. “We are eager for our talented students under Lori Johnston’s leadership to once again provide this resource for our industry peers.”

Johnston also assisted the Cox Institute with the grant application process, which was led by Matt Pruitt, Associate Director of Foundation Relations in UGA’s Office of Corporate and Foundation Relations.

Cox Institute’s eBook from The Lead Podcast Wins Gold Medals

This story was originally published on the Cox Institute page here.

An eBook featuring excerpts of interviews from The Lead podcast won two gold medals in the 2020 eLit Book Awards competition, which recognizes excellence in digital publishing.

The eBook entitled News Leadership: Conversations about Journalism and its Future was released by Kendall Hunt Publishing in December as a project of the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership, which also produces the podcast.

News Leadership received its first gold medal in a current events category for political, economic, legal and media topics. The eBook received its second gold medal in the category recognizing best use of multimedia.

“It was a pleasure to be able to synthesize important leadership and ethical concepts into an interactive tool for journalism students and educators,” said Charlotte Norsworthy, the Cox Institute’s Morris Master’s Fellow, who was the eBook’s lead editor. “By making these concepts more accessible, we are able to better equip students entering a fluctuating news industry.”

The eLit Books Awards, in their eleventh year, are a global awards program open to all members of the electronic publishing industry. The contest is presented by Jenkins Group Inc., a Michigan-based book publishing and marketing services company that has operated the popular Independent Publisher Book Awards contest since 1996. Electronic books written in English and created for the global marketplace were eligible for entry in 65 categories.

News Leadership features insights from established professionals and emerging thought leaders gleaned from their candid conversations with student hosts, including Norsworthy. Their insights offer advice, provide context, and create a sense of optimism for an industry grappling with transformative disruption.

The Lead podcast debuted in the Fall 2016 semester with Daniel Funke as its original student host for the first two semester-length seasons. Nate Bramel and Noelle Lashley took over hosting responsibilities for seasons three and four and Norsworthy led seasons five, six and seven.  In the upcoming season eight, which will debut during the fall semester, Norsworthy moves into the producer’s chair and will direct the episodes featuring the new student host, Caroline Odom.

Guests from The Lead who are featured in the eBook include Pulitzer Prize winners Alex Jones and Nick Chiles, Peabody Award winner Bob Sullivan, local television news legend Monica Kaufman-Pearson and renowned journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault. They are among the dozens of guests who share valuable words of advice with the student hosts and their audiences.

“The Lead podcast has evolved into an important educational resource for presenting insights into the leadership challenges confronting the news media,” said Keith Herndon, the Cox Institute’s director and co-editor of the eBook. “We are excited for this work to be recognized with these eLit Book Awards.”

News Leadership can be purchased through Kendall Hunt at https://he.kendallhunt.com/product/news-leadership-conversations-about-journalism-and-its-future

Kendall Hunt Publishing is a family owned and operated publishing company celebrating a 75-years history. The company has an immense library of course content with over 10,000 print and digital titles. For more information about the publisher, visit: http://he.kendallhunt.com.

Norsworthy and Herndon recorded a special bonus episode of The Lead featuring a discussion on the book’s production, which was posted with the book’s release. The episode can be heard here.

‘The Lead’ podcast wins first place in SPJ Regional Awards

The Society of Professional Journalists recognized Grady’s The Lead Podcast and its host Charlotte Norsworthy as among the best of collegiate journalism for Region 3 in 2019.

The Lead podcast received first place in the Mark of Excellence Awards competition for the region, which comprises student journalists from Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. First-place winners will compete at the national level among other winners from the 12 SPJ regions.

“It’s been such a rewarding experience to take The Lead podcast to new heights over the past two years as host,” Norsworthy said. “I am so grateful to have grown as a journalist alongside the podcast.”

The Grady College’s James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership produces the podcast. It debuted in the Fall 2016 semester with Daniel Funke as its original student host for the first two semester-length seasons. Nate Bramel and Noelle Lashley took over hosting responsibilities for seasons three and four and Norsworthy led seasons five, six and seven, and continues as its current host.

Guests on The Lead have included Pulitzer Prize winners Alex Jones and Nick Chiles, Peabody Award winners Bob Sullivan and Randy Travis, local television news legend Monica Kaufman-Pearson and renowned journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault. They are among the dozens of guests who have share valuable advice with Grady’s journalism students who are the podcast’s target audience. 

“We created The Lead podcast to provide another platform for engaging with the many exceptional guests who visit Grady,” said Keith Herndon, the Cox Institute’s director. “This award, however, reflects how Charlotte Norsworthy has used the podcast to demonstrate and showcase excellent journalistic interviewing techniques.”

Norsworthy will be completing her master’s degree in the fall semester and is moving into the producer’s chair for the Fall 2020 season, which means the Cox Institute is searching for its next student host.  Applications for the position are open through April 10 on UGA’s Handshake. 

The SPJ also recognized the University of Georgia’s independent student newspaper The Red & Black as the region’s best all around non-daily newspaper, and one of its reporters, Grady student Anila Yoganathan, won first place in general news reporting for a series on diversity at the university.