Humor as a Buffer to Negativity in Advertising

Hye Jin Yoon, “Humor as a Buffer to Negativity in Advertising.” Invited lecture at the School of Journalism and Advertising, Southern Illinois UniversityCarbondale, IL, October 24, 2022. 

Will humor increase the effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) advertising? Exploring the role of humor, STD information, and knowledge

Abstract: In this research, we seek to provide effective message strategies to communicate stigma associated health issues such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), by exploring the roles of humor, STD information, and objective HPV knowledge. Conducted with a 2 (Humor: no vs. yes) x 2 (STD information: no vs. yes) between-subjects experiment with objective HPV knowledge as a measured moderator, findings suggested that for the lower HPV knowledge subjects, the humor ads produced higher attention to the ad, more favorable ad attitudes (Aad), and greater behavioral intention to seek HPV prevention and treatment than the no-humor ads when there is no STD information. However, when STD information was present, for the lower HPV knowledge individuals, the no-humor ads produced greater attention and more positive Aad than the humor ads. Humor and STD information in the ads did not affect higher HPV knowledge individuals. Implications for theory as well as practice are discussed. 

Are you JOKING??? Humor in science communication research and practice

Abstract: Scientists have long incorporated humor into their communication, whether it be in informal presentations or peer-reviewed journal articles. Though it seems evident that humor could make stodgy scientific writing more engaging and fun, where is the scientific evidence that it actually empowers science communication? In this session we will discuss research on the use of humor in scientific publications, talk about the implications and caveats of humor use, discuss examples of such use, and share experience into the benefits of using humor in scientific communication.

Comedic violence in advertising: Cultural third-person effects among U.S., Korean, and Croatian consumers

Abstract: Humor is a popular appeal used in global advertising and with the growing use of comedic violence ads in the U.S., it is a worthwhile endeavor to see whether comedic violence ads by U.S. brands could travel globally. This research conducted three studies in three countries, chosen for their distinctively different cultural tendencies and market potential: the U.S., Korea, and Croatia. Across the studies it was found that (1) individuals in the U.S. used aggressive humor in daily life more than Koreans or Croatians, (2) U.S. had higher perceived humor and ad attitudes toward the comedic violence ad than in Korea or Croatia, and (3) U.S. individuals found the comedic violence ad funnier for themselves than for others in different cultures while Koreans thought the ad was less funny for themselves than for others in different cultures. Croatians did not have response differences between self vs. others. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.