Bridging the Fear and Hope: A Smartphone Eye-Tracking Examination of the Effects of Hope in Fear-based Health Messages

Abstract: This study used a smartphone eye-tracking approach to examine understudied areas in health communication – hope in fear appeal – when people are exposed to differential emotional shifts with fear and hope on social media. In an image presentation with 4 (fear only vs. fear-then-hope vs. fear and hope vs. hope-then-fear) between-subjects eye-tracking experiment, participants viewed Instagram posts with variation of emotional shifts, then answered a questionnaire containing measures including perceived self-efficacy and intent to engagement of diabetes preventive behavior. Results indicated that emotional shift from fear to hope influences message processing through raising participants’ perceptions of self-efficacy compared to fear-only image social media content. The research also showed that fear-based images increased people’s attention to efficacy information followed by fear and hope, fear-then-hope, and hope-then-fear condition. Implications for health communication theory and practice are further discussed.

Toward an integrated model of healthy food choice: Examining the moderated mediation effects via online search for nutrition information

Abstract: When numerous reasons behind the obesity problem, such as eating junk food, consuming too many calories, sedentary lifestyle, and other individual-centric causes may not be easily erased, several factors were found to lead people to better healthy eating habits and lifestyles. This study was designed to test a proposed model that consisted of various dynamic factors toward healthy food choice. Results showed that online search for nutrition information was significantly affected by obesity knowledge, but not by BMI. Then, online search for nutrition information would affect healthy food choice, while self-efficacy also promoted healthy food choice. Moreover, online search for nutrition information and self-efficiency jointly yielded a significant impact on healthy food choice. Both practical and theoretical implications were discussed.

The Persuasive Effects of Narrative PSAs on COVID-19 Vaccination Intention: The Mediating Role of Empathy and Psychological Reactance

Abstract: Successful COVID-19 vaccine promotion for the unvaccinated relies on increasing positive reactions but also reducing negative responses to persuasive messages. The current study examined the relative effects of narrative vs. non-narrative public service announcements (PSAs) promoting COVID-19 vaccination on both positive and negative reactions. We explored the role of empathy and psychological reactance as underlying mechanisms. Results of an experiment involving unvaccinated young adults indicate that the narrative (vs. non-narrative) PSAs led to greater empathy. While no direct effects of message type emerged on psychological reactance or vaccination intention, results of a serial multi-mediator model confirmed that empathy and psychological reactance mediated the effects of message type on vaccination intention, yielding theoretical and practical implications for research and practice in COVID-19 vaccination and health communication.

Factors that Impact COVID-19 Conspirational Beliefs and Health-Related Behaviors

Abstract: To further investigate the role of conspirational beliefs on health-related behaviors during a health pandemic such as COVID-19, we conducted an online survey among U.S. adults (N = 798) to examine: (1) the strengths of different groups of individual-level variables in predicting conspiracy beliefs about COVID-19 and related health behaviors; and (2) the role of beliefs in conspiracy theories about COVID-19 in mediating the relationship between individual differences and COVID-19 health-related behaviors. Our findings provide implications to pandemic communication theory and practice.

Trust and Cultural Factors Shaping COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions across Six Countries

Abstract: Based on a COVID-19 pandemic communication survey (N = 3,124) in Australia, Finland, Italy, South Korea, Sweden, and the United States, our study examined how trust in government sources affects the vaccination intention and how this translates into cross-national variations in the outcome. Our findings revealed that the direct effect of trust in government sources on vaccination intention and the indirect effect via power distance and uncertainty avoidance varied across the six countries.

How Emotional Appeals in Health Promotion Messages and User-generated Comments Impact COVID-19 Vaccination Intention: The Mediating Role of Psychological Reactance

Abstract: To close existing research gap and combat vaccine hesitancy among young adults, we conduct this study to integrate psychological reactance theory to better understand the effectiveness of three emerging yet understudied emotional appeals (i.e., guilt, shame, and pride) in health risk context. The current research has two goals: (1) to examine how different emotional appeals (guilt vs. shame vs. pride) and user-generated comments toward COVID-19 vaccine messages independently or interactively affect psychological reactance and (2) to understand the mediating role of psychological reactance between emotional appeals and user-generated comments and desired behavioral outcomes. An experimental study with 3 (guilt vs. shame vs. pride) by 2 (positive-valenced comments vs. negative-valenced comments) between-subjects factorial design will be conducted with college students (aged 18-24) at a large public university in the United States. Our findings strengthen the theoretical foundation on how health risk messages with user-generated comments interactively can predict undesired health outcomes. Our study also helps health organizations design more effective messages targeting at young adults by lowering psychological reactance and enhancing persuasive power in motivating COVID-19 vaccination.

 

Computer-tailored Intervention Increases Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Low-Income African Americans in Primary Care: Results of a Randomized Trial

Abstract: Background: African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality rates of any racial/ethnic group and screening rates remain well below the National Colorectal Cancer rountable screening goal of 80%.
Purpose: This randomized trial compared the efficacy of two clinic-based interventions for increasing CRC screening among African American primary care patients.
Conclusions: The computer-tailored intervention was more effective than a non-tailored brochure for increasing completion of SBT and either screening test. Over 26% of participants were screened with either test at 6 months. Computer-tailored interventions can significantly improve CRC screening rates in low-income African Americans, but the impact of a one-time intervention to promote colonoscopy is limited.