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Whistleblowers and their faith in journalism: The (d)evolution of trust among the sources that journalists need most Karin Assmann

Abstract: Using in-depth interviews conducted with 12 U.S. whistleblowers  who contacted the press in the 1970s through the 2010s, this paper examines changing perceptions of the news media and journalists among those who have confided in them and how these views have evolved. I find that trust in individual journalists, more so than in the […]

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We are the People: Audience Engagement as Catalyst for Newsroom Unionization? Karin Assmann

Abstract: This study explores the tension between management, journalists and their audience around audience engagement with a focus on the role of newsroom unionization. Ethnographic work in three U.S. newsrooms and interviews with 130 journalists, newsroom managers and editors in four newsrooms, shows that audience engagement work encourages unionization and that journalists in already unionized […]

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“A Possibility of a Lady Competitor:” Helen Preece and the 1912 Olympic Modern Pentathlon Kyser Lough

Abstract: On July 7, 1912, the Louisville Herald printed the story of Helen Preece, a teenaged English girl set to be the first and only woman to compete in the Modern Pentathlon at the upcoming Olympic Games in Stockholm. She’d been training for months and attracted international attention. The Modern Pentathlon competition started that same […]

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Solutions in Photojournalism: Visually reporting beyond the problem-based narrative

Jennifer Midberry, Kyser Lough, & Tara Pixley (2020). Solutions in Photojournalism: Visually reporting beyond the problem-based narrative. In Dahmen, N. (chair) panel at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Conference, San Francisco. Description: This panel will overview constructive journalism and then delve into current research findings, including the production, presentation, and effects […]

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Judging photojournalism: The metajournalistic discourse of judges in two photojournalism competitions Kyser Lough

Abstract: This study investigates how discussions during photojournalism award judging can be used as metajournalistic discourse to gain insight about the definition, boundaries and legitimization of the field. Photojournalism awards shape the field by showing what is valued, but the process of judging can also provide insight. The author carries this out through discourse analysis […]

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First-generation immigrants’ and sojourners’ susceptibility to disinformation Solyee Kim

Abstract: News consumption enhances the contact experience for first-generation immigrants and sojourners in their acculturation to the host culture. Using acculturation theory, this study explores interdisciplinary concepts. The authors argue that first-generation immigrants and sojourners’ level of the English proficiency, length of stay in the host culture and their news consumption impact their susceptibility to […]

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Drone Journalism as Visual Aggregation: Toward a Critical History Jay Hamilton

Hamilton, Jay. “Drone Journalism as Visual Aggregation: Toward a Critical History.” Media and Communication 8(3), 2020. https://www.cogitatiopress.com/mediaandcommunication/article/view/3117/3117 Abstract: The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs—commonly referred to as drones) in journalism has emerged only recently, and has grown significantly. This article explores what makes drone imagery as an instance of what scholars of visual culture […]

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Context clues: News audiences and their higher valuation of contextualist journalistic roles Kyser Lough

Abstract: This study explores the news audiences’ perceptions of journalistic roles, in particular the contextualist role, through a U.S. nationally-representative survey. As members of the public lose trust and interest in the media, some outlets are turning to forms of reporting like constructive/solutions journalism to provide a greater context to news consumers. Our survey shows […]

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Journalism and Citizenship: Findings from a Pilot Course at the University of Georgia, Kettering Foundation Lee B. Becker and Tudor Vlad

As citizens’ trust in institutions has plummeted over the last four decades, so too has citizens’ trust in the news media. Citizens are capable of enhancing, even performing, the work of journalism, and journalists are capable of enhancing the work of citizens. When journalists and citizens work together on reporting projects, journalists’ trust in citizens’ […]

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Latino trust in journalists and the 2016 U.S. general election: An analysis of voter responses María E. Len-Ríos and Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Additional author: Patricia Moy Abstract: This paper reports qualitative and quantitative data from a national online panel survey of Latinos (N=720) after the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Participants reported in their closed-ended responses a level of distrust toward the news organizations that largely parallels national figures. In open-ended responses, Latinos cited cable news journalists most […]

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