New Search / Research Home
Journalism and Citizenship: Findings from a Pilot Course at the University of Georgia, Kettering Foundation Lee B. Becker and Tudor Vlad

As citizens’ trust in institutions has plummeted over the last four decades, so too has citizens’ trust in the news media. Citizens are capable of enhancing, even performing, the work of journalism, and journalists are capable of enhancing the work of citizens. When journalists and citizens work together on reporting projects, journalists’ trust in citizens’ […]

Read More
Latino trust in journalists and the 2016 U.S. general election: An analysis of voter responses. María Len-Ríos and Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Abstract: This paper reports qualitative and quantitative data from a national online panel survey of Latinos (N=720) after the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Participants reported in their closed-ended responses a level of distrust toward the news organizations that largely parallels national figures. In open-ended responses, Latinos cited cable news journalists most as trusted journalists, with […]

Read More
How web comments affect perceptions of political interviews and journalistic control. David Clementson

Abstract: People are often exposed to polarized viewpoints in web comment sections. Inspired by attribution theory and framing theory, this article tests the effects of comments that frame a politician or a journalist as triggering evasiveness in a media interview. We compare attributions ascribing deceptiveness to the politician versus external attributions implicating the media situation. […]

Read More
Looks Real, or Really Fake? Warnings, Visual Attention and Detection of False News Articles. Bartosz Wojdynski, Brittany Nicole Jefferson & Matthew Binford

Abstract: In recent years, online misinformation designed to resemble news by adopting news design conventions has proven to be a powerful vehicle for deception and persuasion. In a 2 (prior warning: present/absent) x 2 (article type: false/true) eye-tracking experiment, news consumers (N=49) viewed four science news articles from unfamiliar sources, then rated each article for […]

Read More
Cameramen and Congresswomen: How photojournalists framed female candidates in the Year of the Woman Andrea Briscoe and Kyser Lough

Abstract: This paper explores how female politicians were visually depicted in the 2018 midterm elections in the United States. Through a content analysis of published photographs of female candidates from both winning and losing campaigns, this work adds to the body of literature on visual framing in American politics, with a specific focus on women. […]

Read More
Transitioning to solutions journalism: One newsroom’s shift to solutions-focused reporting. Kyser Lough

Abstract: Solutions journalism — rigorous news reporting on how people are responding to social problems — has gained much attention in the past five years as newsrooms have looked for innovative ways to increase audience engagement. Several news outlets have launched solutions journalism initiatives. However, oftentimes news outlets separate their solution-focused news coverage from their […]

Read More
Science, God, and Nature: A Textual and Frequency Analysis of Public Facebook Comments on News Articles about Agricultural and Environmental Gene Editing Brittany Walker and Jennifer Malson

Abstract: Gene editing is an emerging biotechnology that holds the potential to address some of the most pressing agricultural and environmental challenges. In order to understand public conceptions of gene editing, this study undertook a thematic analysis of 107 Facebook comments and a frequency analysis of 1,290 Facebook comments on news posts about gene editing […]

Read More
Democrat or Republican? Using Political Stereotypes as a Bias Discussion Exercise Keith Herndon

Abstract: This innovative practice paper explains a classroom exercise that asks students to identify anonymous people as either Democrats or Republicans based only on brief descriptions. Students are challenged to explore the reasons behind the identifications they make, specifically confronting the trigger words that lead them to assign a political affiliation. In doing so, the […]

Read More
The landscape of mis(dis)information about science. Michael Cacciatore

Abstract: This presentation is a broad overview of the issue of misinformation as it relates to public understanding of science and the communication of scientific information with public audiences. The presentation is based on a paper I am currently producing for the National Academy of Sciences on the same topic. Link to Presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQZGLe5xl6g

Read More
The Conscience of Corporations and the Right Not to Speak William E. Lee

Abstract: Despite the fact that corporations do not have consciences, in recent years the Supreme Court has been presented with the question of whether restrictions on the actions of a corporation abridge the First Amendment conscience rights of shareholders. Although the Court in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission sidestepped that question, in another October […]

Read More