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Judging photojournalism: The metajournalistic discourse of judges in two photojournalism competitions Kyser Lough

Abstract: This study investigates how discussions during photojournalism award judging can be used as metajournalistic discourse to gain insight about the definition, boundaries and legitimization of the field. Photojournalism awards shape the field by showing what is valued, but the process of judging can also provide insight. The author carries this out through discourse analysis […]

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Patriarchal Pits: The gendered experiences of female concert photographers Kyser Lough

Abstract: While the presence of women in photojournalism is increasing, the way they are treated by their male counterparts remains unbalanced. Drawing from feminist theory and embodiment, this study examines how the gendered experience plays out for women in a particular niche of photojournalism; concert photography. The restricted access of the music scene and the […]

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Drone Journalism as Visual Aggregation: Toward a Critical History Jay Hamilton

Hamilton, Jay. “Drone Journalism as Visual Aggregation: Toward a Critical History.” Media and Communication 8(3), 2020. https://www.cogitatiopress.com/mediaandcommunication/article/view/3117/3117 Abstract: The use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs—commonly referred to as drones) in journalism has emerged only recently, and has grown significantly. This article explores what makes drone imagery as an instance of what scholars of visual culture […]

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Entrepreneurial Leadership: Teaching Product Development Principles Using the Perceived Attributes of Innovation Keith Herndon

Keith Herndon and Caroline Windham (Grady M.A. student). (Forthcoming 2020, July). Entrepreneurial Leadership: Teaching Product Development Principles Using the Perceived Attributes of Innovation. Paper accepted for the annual conference of the Association of Leadership Educators, Nashville, TN. Abstract: This innovative practice paper presents a classroom exercise used to demonstrate the importance of product development within […]

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Making instant adjustments to online journalism education: Responding to continuous needs assessments in asynchronous courses Amanda Bright

Bright, A.C. (2020). Making instant adjustments to online journalism education: Responding to continuous needs assessments in asynchronous courses. Online Learning, 24(2), 245-253. https://doi.org/10.24059/olj.v24i2.2034 Abstract: The creation of an effective learning environment is always a challenge, but when the environment is online and the learners are a diverse group of adults in a specialized content area, […]

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Context clues: News audiences and their higher valuation of contextualist journalistic roles Kyser Lough

Abstract: This study explores the news audiences’ perceptions of journalistic roles, in particular the contextualist role, through a U.S. nationally-representative survey. As members of the public lose trust and interest in the media, some outlets are turning to forms of reporting like constructive/solutions journalism to provide a greater context to news consumers. Our survey shows […]

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Democrat or Republican? Using Political Stereotypes as a Bias Discussion Exercise Keith Herndon

Herndon, Keith; Norsworthy, Charlotte and Kor-Sins, Ryan (Grady MA students). (Forthcoming). Democrat or Republican? Using Political Stereotypes as a Bias Discussion Exercise. Journal of Leadership Education. Abstract: This innovative practice paper explains a classroom leadership exercise that asks students to identify anonymous people as either Democrats or Republicans based only on brief descriptions. Students are […]

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Making Instant Adjustments in Online Journalism Education: Responding to Continuous Needs Assessments in Asynchronous Courses Amanda Bright

Abstract: The creation of an effective learning environment is always a challenge, but when the environment is online and the learners are a diverse group of adults in a specialized content area, the challenges become more complex. This best practices study used the intersection of the importance of the learner, Knowles’ andragogy concepts, and the […]

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The Conscience of Corporations and the Right Not to Speak William E. Lee

Abstract: Despite the fact that corporations do not have consciences, in recent years the Supreme Court has been presented with the question of whether restrictions on the actions of a corporation abridge the First Amendment conscience rights of shareholders.  Although the Court in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission sidestepped that question, in another […]

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Why won’t you answer the question? Mass-mediated deception detection after journalists’ accusations of politicians’ evasion David Clementson

Abstract: Journalists often accuse politicians of dodging questions. Truth-default theory (TDT) predicts that when journalists serve as de facto deception detectors, the audience will process the messaging through a cognitive sequence that lowers the perceived trustworthiness of the politician. Conversely, the public’s perception of the media as being generally hostile and biased in their reporting […]

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