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Letters to Mr. Rogers: Historicizing Critical Audience Studies in Broadcasting Taylor Cole Miller

Abstract: With the Peabody Awards’ mission to honor “stories that matter,” producers often include evidence of cultural successes with audiences in submissions. Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood demonstrated the value of its fan engagement with a very different kind of package in 1984: a notebook of letters from parents of or children with disabilities. Using letters to […]

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Camera point-of-view exacerbates racial bias in viewers of police use of force videos Glenna Read

Abstract: The implementation of body-worn cameras (BWC) by policing agencies has received widespread support from many individuals, including citizens and police officers. Despite their increasing prevalence, little is known about how the point-of-view (POV) of these cameras affects perceptions of viewers. In this research, we investigate how POV interacts with skin color of citizens in […]

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Judging photojournalism: The metajournalistic discourse of judges at the Best of Photojournalism and Pictures of the Year contests Kyser Lough

(Forthcoming) Abstract: This study promotes how discussions during photojournalism award judging can be used as metajournalistic discourse to gain insight about the definition, boundaries and legitimization of the field. Journalism awards signal value, but the deliberation process offers richer insight via the judges’ comments. This study explores that process in two stages through discourse analysis […]

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Transitioning to solutions journalism: One newsroom’s shift to solutions-focused reporting.

Abstract: In 2018, Alabama’s largest daily newspaper, the Gannett-owned Montgomery Advertiser, set out to transform its newsroom to focus on enterprise and solutions journalism—rigorous news reporting on how people are responding to social problems, a practice that has gained attention as newsrooms have looked for innovative ways to increase audience engagement. To examine its impact, […]

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The First Amendment is an Absolute Charles N. Davis

Abstract: Students new to the study of First Amendment law often grapple with the complexity and ambiguity of its parameters, a sensation familiar to all who encounter legal analysis and scholarship for the first time. Legal scholars thrive upon nuance, parsing the meaning of a single word and arguing passionately about the historiography of legislative intent. […]

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Whistleblowers and their faith in journalism: The (d)evolution of trust among the sources that journalists need most Karin Assmann

Abstract: Using in-depth interviews conducted with 12 U.S. whistleblowers  who contacted the press in the 1970s through the 2010s, this paper examines changing perceptions of the news media and journalists among those who have confided in them and how these views have evolved. I find that trust in individual journalists, more so than in the […]

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We are the People: Audience Engagement as Catalyst for Newsroom Unionization? Karin Assmann

Abstract: This study explores the tension between management, journalists and their audience around audience engagement with a focus on the role of newsroom unionization. Ethnographic work in three U.S. newsrooms and interviews with 130 journalists, newsroom managers and editors in four newsrooms, shows that audience engagement work encourages unionization and that journalists in already unionized […]

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Inside the Bellotti Court William E. Lee

Abstract: No publishing company has ever been denied First Amendment protection because it was incorporated. In First National Bank of Boston v. Bellotti, however, the Supreme Court confronted for the first time questions about the impact of corporate identity on the First Amendment protections available to non-media businesses. This Article explains why Justice Powell’s opinion […]

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“A Possibility of a Lady Competitor:” Helen Preece and the 1912 Olympic Modern Pentathlon Kyser Lough

Abstract: On July 7, 1912, the Louisville Herald printed the story of Helen Preece, a teenaged English girl set to be the first and only woman to compete in the Modern Pentathlon at the upcoming Olympic Games in Stockholm. She’d been training for months and attracted international attention. The Modern Pentathlon competition started that same […]

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Community Radio in Contemporary South Africa – Deconstructing Complexities in Demarginalization Wunpini Fatimata Mohammed

Abstract: We used on-site interviews and roundtable conversations with practitioners to uncover original evidence of ways in which two variant South African communities activated citizens’ involvement in radio co-production of content. We found dual analytical filters in state control of radio during two colonialisms and via contemporary policy regimes rooted in conceptualizations of participatory communication. […]

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