New Search / Research Home
Information flow and leadership challenges Juan Meng and Michael Cacciatore

Abstract: How to effectively manage information flow continues presenting challenges for public relations practice, reflecting the magnitude and impact of a data-driven and strategy-oriented market environment globally. To echo this emerging global trend and identify effective responsive strategies, this study explores public relations practitioners’ perceptions on the impact of information flow and digital revolution on their […]

Read More
The impact of trust on public relations practitioners’ job satisfaction Juan Meng

Abstract: In this study, we propose and conduct a moderated multiple mediation analysis to depict both direct and indirect effects of trust in organization on public relations practitioners’ job satisfaction. Using a national online survey of public relations practitioners in the U.S. (N = 838), our findings reveal significant results, suggesting that trust has a strong […]

Read More
The Effects of News Framing and Issue Attribution on Chinese College Students’ Responses to Depression Coverage Yan Jin

Abstract: Depression is now one of the most severe public health threats in China and among Chinese college students. To examine the role of depression news coverage and address barriers in communicating with Chinese college students about the risk of depression and the importance of providing social support to depressed individuals, a 2 (episodic vs. […]

Read More
Corporate WeChat Communication in China Yan Jin

Abstract: This study tackles the gap in public relations research on how corporations utilize WeChat, the dominant social media in China, to communicate and interact with publics. Using a content analysis of 1,488 WeChat posts of 15 top Chinese business-to-consumer enterprises, this study examined how the organizational factors (i.e., company type, ownership, and industry) and […]

Read More
What Makes Brands’ Postings More Viral Jhih-Syuan (Elaine) Lin

Abstract: This study explores how different strategies used in firms’ Facebook postings increase consumers’ eWOM responses. A computational analysis of Fortune 100 companies’ Facebook postings and their respective comments/likes/shares were performed using Python libraries and the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) software. As a result, we develop a predictive model of eWOM, aiming to […]

Read More
The Mediating effects of presumed influences on Taiwanese consumers’ skepticism toward celebrity endorsed advertising Juan Meng

Abstract: To explore Taiwanese consumers’ presumed influences of celebrity endorsed advertising, national media consumer panels were carried out to examine how the first-person and third-person perceptions would mediate the impacts of celebrity credibility on advertising skepticism. Results revealed that (a) the third-person perceptions did take place in the context of celebrity endorsed advertising, (b) all three […]

Read More
Uses and Gratifications of Social Networking Sites for Social Capital Joe Phua and Jihoon (Jay) Kim

Abstract: Applying uses and gratifications theory (UGT), this study examined users of four social networking sites (SNSs): Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat, and their influence on online bridging and bonding social capital. Results (N = 297) indicated that Snapchat users scored highest for passing time, sharing problems, and gaining social knowledge, while Instagram users scored […]

Read More
Parents’ Presumed Persuasion Knowledge of Children’s Advergames Nathaniel J. Evans

Abstract: Research indicates that parents have a limited understanding of advergames. This study examines the effects of advertising disclosures and cognitive load on parents’ activation of persuasion knowledge for a children’s advergame. While parents exposed to any advertising disclosure reported higher levels of persuasion knowledge, a single-modality disclosure resulted in more persuasion knowledge activation than […]

Read More
The lure of rationality Michael Cacciatore

Abstract: Historically, science communication has been predicated on the assumption that ignorance is the basis of a lack of societal support for various issues in science and technology. This model, known as the knowledge deficit model of science communication, has led much of the subsequent research in the field to explore the concept of science literacy. […]

Read More