Vicki Michaelis receives Association for Women in Sports Media award

Vicki Michaelis, the John Huland Carmical Chair in Sports Journalism & Society and director of the John Huland Carmical Sports Media Institute, is the recipient of the 2022 Ann Miller Service Award by Association for Women in Sports Media. It is presented annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the organization.

Michaelis has worked at Grady College since 2012, and has been the faculty adviser for the AWSM student chapter at the University of Georgia and she regularly participates in conventions as a moderator or panelist.

Before joining UGA, she spent more than two decades as a sports journalist, including at USA Today as the lead Olympics reporter and Denver bureau sportswriter covering professional and college sports. She also was a reporter for The Denver Post and The Palm Beach Post.

“Getting an award named for Ann Miller? Priceless to me,” Michaelis said. “She isn’t just part of AWSM’s foundation. She’s part of its soul. That soul, that community, has meant so much to me and my career — as both a journalist and a professor. I am truly honored.”

Michaelis is a former president and chair of the board who has played a role in several AWSM endeavors. She was a regional coordinator, helping plan and host events in the Denver area, and took on treasurer responsibilities during her time as chair.

“Vicki’s involvement and support of AWSM long after serving on the board embodies what the Ann Miller Service Award is all about,” AWSM president Ashley Colley said. “She has helped so many women at both the student and professional level. I’ve witnessed her contributions on both fronts, working with student chapters and giving advice to many of our members seeking guidance from a veteran woman in this industry. We thank Vicki for always making time to give back to AWSM.”

Established in 2013, AWSM’s service award is named in honor of Ann Miller, a longtime Hawaii-based sports reporter who was the organization’s treasurer for its first 10 years, served as board chair and has attended nearly every convention despite the long travel distance.


Editor’s Note: The above was edited from a feature written by AWSM. An original copy of this feature can be found on the AWSM website.

Vicki Michaelis provides input to students in an outdoor class of Multi-platform Storytelling in Sports in April 2022. (Photo: Sarah E. Freeman)

Grady InternViews: Dania Kalaji

This is part of a series where we ask Grady College students to describe their summer internship experience.

Briefly describe your internship and your responsibilities. 

I am a Dow Jones News Fund intern. I’m in a cohort of around 150 other Dow Jones news interns who are placed in specific newsrooms around the country. These newsrooms have a contract affiliation with the Dow Jones News Fund so that they can better equip younger journalists. The one I’m with is called Bay City News Foundation. It is based in Oakland, California, but I’m living in San Francisco. It’s a newswire and a nonprofit that covers the entire Bay Area.

My internship is really flexible, so some days of the week, I’ll be writing daily news stories that are cast out on its newswire to around 8 million audience viewers. On the other hand, I’m also working on bigger capstone stories. Although my position is listed as a copy editor, they’re giving me the ability to also write stories – which is really great for me, because that’s my forte. I’m doing a mix of writing, copy editing and social media.

student on computer
Dania attended training at the Moody College of Communication at the University of Texas before moving to the Bay Area for her internship this summer. (Photo:Bradley Wilson)
What has been your favorite part about your internship so far?

My favorite part about my internship so far would definitely be the 10 day training at the University of Texas. For those 10 days, it was long hours and pretty rigorous training, but it really taught me how important it is to be a well-rounded journalist. It doesn’t just take writing, telling a story and giving people voices that we seldom hear – it’s also about the nitty gritty stuff. By that, I mean headlines, SEO and framing your stories in particular ways on social media or in newspapers as well.

I was in a cohort with about 15 other Dow Jones news fund interns and that was the best part of it, being able to make new friends that are at my exact same level in journalism and my age. It was great to connect with them, and connect with the professors that were leading the program and to hear from different panelists from, for example, the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post – it was really such a well-rounded experience.

What about this role has surprised you?

I think what’s most surprising is the trust that they’ve placed in me as an intern. I think that it’s really important when they place trust in you, because it allows you to grow and to see where your interests lie. I’m really interested in arts and entertainment, as well as critical writing. I think having that time to experiment is very important. Having these resources around you, all the professional journalists who’ve been in the industry for so long, they want to give you the guidance and the training. I think that is surprising to a lot of interns, especially myself, is that people really do want to help you and see you thrive. That’s why they gave you this position.

Dania will serve as the digital managing editor for The Red and Black this fall. She’s glad to have found a student-run publication that feels like home, where she’s grown as a journalist. (Photo:submitted)

Given that trust, I’m able to cover bigger stories. I’m working on this huge story on the Bay Area about gentrification and how it’s affecting artists of color. The trust they’ve placed in me is what gives me that confidence to reach out to what I call “sharks”, those are the sources that are really hard to seek and are sometimes impossible to reach. But because your mentors give you that competence, you never know what could happen. So, because I was able to reach out to this person, with the confidence and the trust they’ve given me, I now have this really big interview, and I wouldn’t have had that if they didn’t push me to do so.

How will this internship guide you in your future career path?

Coming into college, I felt really lucky knowing that journalism is what I wanted to do, and choosing UGA wasn’t hard because I knew Grady had such an incredible program that sets you up perfectly for all these careers. I got my current internship because I did an internship last summer with Pensacola News Journal, which is my hometown paper. It’s part of Gannett, which is the USA Today network. I was able to get that internship because my professors and mentors at Grady, who were the ones that pushed me to do so. They gave me that competence to do it, because I knew I could, but I just needed to hear it from other people who I trust and look up to as models. After getting that internship, that’s when I was able to open my network in the journalism world. Now, I feel that I’m in a good place to explore the many options of journalism. Since I’ve been at The Red and Black (this will be my third year now), I’ve moved my way up in the ranks. I started as a contributor on the news desk, and then I was the outreach manager, and then I was the diversity, equity and inclusion chair for a year. Coming into the fall, I’ll be the digital managing editor. It’s really cool to be able to immerse yourself in everything that Grady and UGA has to offer, because that’s what’s going to ultimately lead me into my next role.

Dania’s view from the press box at the Chase Center, where she covered the NBA finals game for the Golden State Warriors. (Photo:submitted)

This internship is teaching me about different aspects of journalism, so that I can figure out exactly what I want to do later down the road. Given all of these opportunities, I’m really interested in the arts and entertainment world of journalism. I think the landscape of being a critic and writing film reviews is really exciting. What also excites me is breaking news and enterprise stories that are focused on diverse communities, and the people that we don’t really get to hear from a lot. When you look at my work, that’s what my stories are mostly focused on. I think as a young journalist, being able to navigate through all these internships and through all the different opportunities that you’re given is such a blessing because you get to experience all aspects of journalism.

How have your experiences at Grady prepared you for this internship?

I’ve started speaking at a lot of journalism classes, especially the journalism seminar that Dean Davis leads. Every time I’m asked to speak in those seminars, I always start with this, and it’s that if I hadn’t joined The Red and Black, I would not be where I am right now. I say that with full confidence. Without The Red and Black, I wouldn’t be half the journalist I am today. It’s so easy to start somewhere there, and then so quickly get sucked in and go up the ranks. All of a sudden, you’re the digital managing editor, and it’s because you love it so much. It’s just an overall well-rounded experience. Through The Red and Black, I’ve been able to work alongside people, not only in my journalism cohort, but people of different ages. It’s cool to communicate with everyone and build those relationships, because it shows you how important it is to keep those people close to you, because we’re all going through the same thing. The Red and Black is like my home – I’m really lucky to have found a student-run publication that’s made me feel so comfortable, and that I can grow in any aspect that I want to.

As a multiplatform editing intern, Dania is writing stories for the Bay City News Foundation. She recently wrote a story on the Golden State Warriors victory at the NBA finals in San Francisco on June 16. (Photo:submitted)

I really think that the professors at Grady are so well-equipped for the world beyond college, and they really prepare you for that. Out of all the classes that I’ve taken, two classes I took in the past semester have especially prepared me for this internship. One of them was feature writing with Nick Chiles. I’ve never been challenged that much in a course before, and it’s because he really pushed us to be the best journalism students we could be. Especially in feature writing, I learned how to display human emotion through stories – and it’s really hard. You don’t really know how hard it is until you’re actually sitting there with a blank Google doc, and you’re like how do I even start…how do I convey a human emotion through this hour long interview that I just had? Also, I took a multiplatform story production with Charlotte Norsworthy. She’s so incredible – she was also my newsroom advisor at The Red and Black, and part of the reason why I’m in this internship today is because she’s just so stellar. I learned so much about not just writing a story, but how to equip it with good visuals, audio, video and social media – all the things you need in today’s day and age in any journalism role. Those two classes really showed me how important it is to put care into my journalism classes as much as I put care into working at The Red and Black. At the end of the day, those professors are going to be vouching for you, and they will remember you.

Dania (back row, third from left) pictured with other Dow Jones interns at the University of Texas. (Photo:Bradley Wilson)

The camera eats first: Q&A with Kyser Lough

Assistant Professor Kyser Lough teaches in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communications’ photojournalism program and studies visual communication, with an emphasis on photojournalism, as well as solutions journalism. In this interview, Lough discusses the continuing role of photojournalists in an age of ubiquitous imagery, and how he teaches his students to navigate that landscape. Read more about his research here.

How do you describe photojournalism research?

You can think of it several different ways, and the first is looking at the images themselves: What are the images telling us? How are they chosen? What’s being left out? Who is in the image? What kind of effects do these images have on people? That’s a big question surrounding conflict photography especially—we need these photos to see what’s going on, but what kind of toll is it taking on us to constantly see images of conflict?

What we often forget about is there’s a person behind the camera making these pictures, and that person has to physically be there. During the pandemic a lot of reporters were stuck at home; they were calling their sources and having Zoom meetings. The photographers had to go to these places to make these photos. So there are a lot of questions surrounding access and embodiment when it comes to being a photojournalist—how they have to use their bodies in the act of photography, not just to maneuver to make photos but also in negotiating for access to where they need to be.

It’s also fascinating to dig into photographers’ minds and ask about their process. How do they look for things to photograph? How do they decide what, who and when to photograph? When you combine that with talking about access and embodiment, it gives us a deeper look into the images.

As a visual communicator, what your thoughts about how the media world we live in has changed over the last two or three decades?

It’s definitely changed how we think of images. We toggle back and forth between seeing images as pure, unadulterated reality or pure, unadulterated fiction. It’s something we have to consider when we think about modern-day news literacy. In being worried about misinformation and disinformation, we need to really look at images. Part of that is putting the focus back on the image creator and the image owner. Just like we try and vet news sources, we also need to vet image sources and understand that many different things could have happened between an image being captured and us seeing it.

With deep fake video technology and ever more sophisticated photo-editing software, how are we going to determine the truth of an image in the future?

There is fascinating work being done on this right now. Part of it is news literacy and training us to have a healthy dose of skepticism when consuming news. But on the other end, there are computer scientists developing algorithms to analyze and detect alteration in images and video.

From the professional side, there are organizations and people working to prevent it on the creation end. So instead of trying to detect a fake image, it’s about providing a certificate of authenticity: “This image is real.” The Content Authenticity Initiative is probably the biggest one right now, where they are working with Adobe and other folks to essentially create a uneditable chain of edits and history on a photo. You can see the date and time the image was taken, but also see that it was loaded into Photoshop and these different edits were made. If that’s widely adopted—and the problem is it has to be adopted—then we can use that to vet images before they are out there and manipulated.

Dr. Kyser Lough Assistant Professor, Journalism
“We toggle back and forth between seeing images as pure, unadulterated reality or pure, unadulterated fiction. It’s something we have to consider when we think about modern-day news literacy,” Lough said. “Just like we try and vet news sources, we also need to vet image sources and understand that many different things could have happened between an image being captured and us seeing it.” (Photo by Jason Thrasher)
On a more positive note, all this changing technology and media affords a lot more possibilities to photojournalists in how they create and publish and share their work. What do you teach your students about how to leverage that to their advantage?

We start with the core foundation that storytelling matters, first and foremost. It has to be a good story. It has to be a good moment. We have to be people-focused. We start there, and then we can think about the platforms we use to tell this story. It’s so easy to get lost in the shiny new thing and forget we have to start as good journalists and good storytellers.

Now that everyone has a camera in their pocket, do we still need photojournalists?

That’s such a great question. In 2009, an airplane landed in the Hudson River in New York, and one of the first images to spread from that was not taken by a photojournalist—it was taken by a man on a ferry with a cell phone. He uploaded it to Twitter, and within minutes it was all over the place. Of course, now that’s commonplace. We know when something’s happening, and we’re not just seeing pictures posted—we’re seeing people livestreaming from their phones.

It’s very important for society to have that ability, for us to be able to witness and surveil as private citizens. On the other side of it, however, I firmly believe it’s still important to have photojournalists and trained storytellers out there because of the ethics and sensitivity surrounding a lot of the stories we’re trying to tell.

Journalism should be independent. There should be no conflict of interest; the journalist covering the story should not be involved in the story. The journalist’s images, while not being completely objective, are still representative of an independent observer who has been trained in how to be fair and how to cover the story and how to skillfully use the equipment. We still need journalists to tell these stories and uncover instances where power is being abused, and especially to protect the vulnerable.

Are your students more sophisticated about visual communications, having grown up with Instagram and Twitter and all of these new media?

I like to think so. It’s hard to think back to a time when we didn’t have a camera in our pocket, although it hasn’t been that long when you think about it. The biggest shift has been in the visual literacy students have in how the cell phone camera has allowed them to regularly observe and document their daily life. Once on a study abroad program we sat down to dinner, and the students brought out their phones and took pictures of the food. The phrase they taught me was: “Phone eats first.” And I love it. There’s no shame in it. I mean, when else in history has it been this easy to just snag a picture of anything and then go back and use the photo as a memory device?

Dr. Kyser Lough Assistant Professor, Journalism
Despite all the new technologies in photography that have emerged over recent decades, Lough teaches his students that basic principles still apply when it comes to photojournalism. “Storytelling matters, first and foremost,” he said. “We start there, and then we can think about the platforms we use to tell this story. It’s so easy to get lost in the shiny new thing and forget we have to start as good journalists and good storytellers.” (Photo by Jason Thrasher)
What’s the best photo you’ve ever taken?

Recently I haven’t been able to do as much photography as I have in the past, because my priorities are research and teaching. But we take our students out into the world as much as possible to get experiential learning, so I like to try and turn the camera around on them and those have been my favorite recent photos—the pictures of my students photographing. I’ve really enjoyed documenting the process as they grab their cameras and go out and do things. When I’ve taught study abroad, I took pictures of them photographing, and at the end of the program I wrote them a note and gave each one pictures of them out making photos.

The other answer to that question would be the times that I haven’t taken a picture. This is something that I usually wrap my photo classes with, this idea that just because we can doesn’t mean we should, especially in the day and age when we all have a camera in our pocket. I challenge my students to think about when to take a picture and when to simply use your five senses to really sit in that moment. Not everything has to be photographed.


The above feature was originally written and posted by UGA Research, and can also be round on the UGA Research website

 

Grady InternViews: LJ Jackson

 

This is part of a series where we ask Grady College students to describe their summer internship experience.

black background graphic with red text that says "LJ Jackson, hometown: Acworth, Georiga, Major: journalism, title: digital/social media content intern, Company: New York Red Bulls, Location: Harrison, New Jersey, along with Grady College logo.

Briefly describe your internship and responsibilities.

I am currently a digital and social media content intern for the New York Red Bulls, and I assist with content creation to all major New York Red Bull social media sites via video editing, photography, graphics and story production. I help plan content schedules to showcase player personalities, game highlights, brand activations and sponsorship sales. Most of my time is spent filming practice content and then editing reels and photos for the social pages. When I am not doing that, I am in collaborative meetings with the marketing and/or video teams.

I work from two locations. Red Bull Arena is the main office that is a short 10-minute ride across the Hudson River to Manhattan. This is where most of administration, marketing and content creators are located. This is also where the team hosts their home games. I also work from the practice facility located in Whippany, New Jersey. Most of our Instagram Reels and TikTok content is from practice, so I spend a considerable amount of time here as well.

What has been your most memorable experience so far?

The most memorable experience I have is working at Red Bull Arena for the friendly (scrimmage) against Barcelona. I grew up watching Lionel Messi, Neymar and Pedro. I never thought that I would have the opportunity to watch Barcelona in action, because of the distance and costliness of the matches. So, not only did I get to see them play in-person, but I had the chance to create content involving them. It was crazy how much of a full circle thing it was.

What’s the most challenging part of this position?

The biggest challenge has been finding effective ways to showcase all of the personalities we have on the team. The club has some great guys like Dru Yearwood, John Tolkin and Thomas Edwards. I want to represent them accurately to really allow the surrounding community to see that despite their incredible athletic ability, these guys are human and love to have fun on and off the pitch.

student LJ is holding up a camera while in the Red Bulls Soccer Club arena
LJ holds up a camera. Part of his role as an intern is to create video content for the soccer club. (Photo: submitted)
How has the certificate in sports media prepared you for this role?

The social media class that I took prepared me for this role exponentially. When assigned our team sports that we would be following for the semester, I was disappointed that I did not receive baseball, but in the long-term it was the best thing that could have happened for my career ending up with the soccer team. Running the Clarke Central boys soccer social media sites enhanced my knowledge of soccer and it taught me how to be anticipatory of plays that I could capture for content. Since the Red Bulls are a Major League Soccer organization, it’s easy to see the connection here.

What advice would you give to other sports media students?

Sometimes you just have to walk in the room and act like you own it. You may not know what to do, and that’s okay. You can figure out the logistics later, but don’t let anyone stop you from getting that perfect shot, the best angle for a video, and don’t be afraid to communicate with players. You may be nervous in approaching them, but I promise they are just as nervous approaching you as you are approaching them. Oftentimes we make the fear of rejection or having a negative interaction way worse in our heads than it actually is. Confidence will carry you however far you let it take you.

 

Journalism Innovation Lab Fellows complete work-based projects

Listening to audiences, engaging younger users and creating brand cohesion — these were goals UGA journalism majors accomplished during the launch of our innovation teams and fellowship programs.

These Journalism Innovation Teams and Fellows, based out of the Journalism Innovation Lab of the Cox Institute, create industry partnerships to bring emerging ideas and practices into Georgia news organizations by allowing select students to work at a precise and strategic level on innovation in today’s newsrooms.

Georgia Association of Broadcasters Innovation Fellow

Funded by the GAB, our innovation fellow worked with Habersham Broadcasting. This locally owned and operated set of two radio stations — My Country 99.3 and 107.7 the Breeze — serves a large audience in northeast Georgia, and its leadership wanted to begin to reach a younger demographic through its digital products. UGA journalism major Ashley Balsavias worked with Habersham to grow and engage younger listeners through the My Country 99.3 Instagram page, creating strategies for that platform, cross-promoting to the station’s app, and creating a best practices guide for future use.

Georgia Association of Broadcasters Innovation Team

A team of journalism majors — Victoria Gospodinov, Lily Baldwin and Haley Roberson — worked with Salem Media Group of Atlanta for our GAB-funded innovation team. Operating on the goals of increasing engagement and growing audience demographics, the team did audience research, created a robust brand style guide to improve digital product coherence, and crafted a forward-thinking content strategy for influencers, concepts and campaigns to continue diverse growth in both listeners and digital platforms.

UX Research Innovation Team with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution

The success of the Unapologetically ATL email newsletter, a product of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, was the focus of study for a UX research innovation team made up of journalism seniors Maddy Franklin, Ally Gray, Nimra Ahmad and Yana Obiekwe. Through analytics, quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews with audience members, the team found what specific elements were contributing to the newletter’s strong performance, so that these could be employed with other digital products. Also, a few future recommendations for growth were presented to capitalize on what audiences prefer in the niche news product.


The Journalism Innovation Lab will build another GAB Innovation Team and pair another GAB Innovation Fellow with a Georgia broadcaster in the fall 2022 semester, as well as participate in the Reynolds Journalism Institute Student Innovation Competition. Contact Dr. Amanda Bright or see Handshake for details on how to apply starting in late summer.

 

Jonathan Peters named Department of Journalism Head

Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication proudly announces Jonathan Peters as the new head of the Department of Journalism.

“I am delighted that Jon is joining the leadership team,” said Charles N. Davis, dean of Grady College. “Jon is a Russell Award-winning teacher and an internationally renowned First Amendment scholar, making him a well-rounded choice to lead our journalism department faculty and curriculum.”

Jonathan Peters talks with a student at his Teacher of the Year reception in 2019.
Jonathan Peters talks with a student at his Teacher of the Year reception in 2019. (Photo: Sarah E. Freeman)

Peters, an associate professor who holds an affiliate faculty position in the UGA School of Law, specializes in communication law and policy. His research focuses on internet companies and decisions made about content they host. Peters also studies how economic, political and technological changes affect modern journalism.

His published research has appeared in the Berkeley Technology Law Journal, the Harvard Law and Policy Review, and the Federal Communications Law Journal, among others.

“It’s an honor to be entrusted to serve the department and I am grateful for the opportunity,” Peters said. “I’m thankful, too, to have such a terrific model in Dr. Janice Hume. She has been an outstanding chair, and I’m relieved she’ll be just down the hallway to answer the dozens of questions I’ll have (and that’ll be only the first day).”

Peters assumes leadership for the Department of Journalism on August 1 when Hume assumes the role of associate dean for academic affairs for the College.

In addition to his teaching and research, Peters serves as the press freedom correspondent for the Columbia Journalism Review. He has written about legal issues for EsquireThe AtlanticSlateWired, NBC News, and CNN, and has been interviewed on related topics by The New York TimesThe Washington PostVanity Fair and NPR, among others.

Peters is a volunteer First Amendment lawyer for the Student Press Law Center and the ACLU. He has also testified in litigation as an expert witness on media law, and he has conducted legal seminars for dozens of news organizations, including the radio program “This American Life” and the podcast “Serial.” In 2020, Peters consulted with the Uzbekistan government as part of a United Nations program focusing on how the government can strengthen public access to the nation’s judiciary as well as public trust in it.

In 2021, Peters was honored as the Russell Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, UGA’s highest early-career teaching honor, and was recognized in 2019 as the Journalism Teacher of the Year at Grady College.

“My colleagues are the absolute best,” Peters continues. “Every one of them has helped me—in different ways—become a better teacher, researcher, and human being. And our students are phenomenal. They’re smart and conscientious, and they’re so creative and curious. They demand your A-game as an instructor and advisor. All of which is why I’m excited about my new role.”

Peters has a B.S. in journalism from Ohio University, a J.D. from Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in journalism from the University of Missouri.

Grady InternViews: Alex Anteau

This is part of a series where we ask Grady College students to describe their summer internship experience.

Briefly describe your internship and your responsibilities.

I’m basically a full-time reporter. Because I’m an intern I don’t do a lot of breaking news or anything, but I write and report stories for the Athens Banner-Herald website.

What is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned so far?graphic which describes Alex Anteau. hometown is izhevsk, Russia. major is health and medical journalism (master's of arts), Alex's title is a reporting intern at the Athens Banner-Herald. The location of the internship is in Athens, GA although it is a hybrid role.

As a health reporter, I spend a lot of time talking to the people who are most involved and affected by the subject I’m writing about. This involves a combination of trauma-informed reporting and taking the time to establish trust with the person you’re interviewing. The most important lesson I’ve learned as I’ve stepped into my first full-time reporting role is that I need to schedule more time for these meetings. It is a huge privilege to have a stranger share a vulnerable and often difficult experience with you. It means a lot to me when I click with someone and have a conversation that goes longer than expected. However, it’s also super important to be mindful of time and respect the schedule of whoever you’re meeting with next.

What about this position has surprised you?

How much freedom I have in my reporting. It’s honestly been really amazing – I’ve had the opportunity to take a lot of initiative in this role. Most of the stories I cover are ones I’ve personally pitched and I’m really grateful for the trust my editors have given me in pursuing the leads I think are important.

What is a challenge or a benefit of working remotely?

The flexibility! My schedule heavily depends on my sources’ availability. Often folks are talking to me after work or on their days off, which means that my hours fall outside the traditional 9-5 office work day. I do love coming into the office for meetings and to talk to my coworkers, but it’s nice to not need to worry about carving out time on-site and to instead focus on getting to know the community and writing. I think the challenge is to not over-do it. In my experience office culture has a lot of built-in down time which you don’t necessarily have at home and I’m still learning to pace myself and not overbook my schedule.

What advice would you give to other students looking to pursue similar opportunities?

Be a self-starter. Get familiar with the beat you’re working in and practice writing and reporting in your downtime (if you haven’t been able to land a paid internship opportunity yet, I highly recommend becoming a Red & Black contributor and applying to staff roles). The more you do journalism, the more experience and clips you’ll have when it comes to apply, and, more importantly, the more you’ll get to know the subjects you are writing about and have insight and story ideas that others might not.

What has been your favorite part about the internship so far?
selfie of student Alex Anteau, working from home.
Alex works from a home office, as the internship is primarily remote. (Photo:submitted)

My coworkers and the projects I’ve been working on. In my first two weeks I’ve had the opportunity to start working on a wide variety of stories, from enterprise to breaking news, covering everything from local elections to neighborhood cats. My editors have given me incredible feedback that’s had a huge impact on how I report, and the other journalists at the Athens Banner-Herald have been gracious and kind and really open to collaborating on stories with me.

Janice Hume named Grady College associate dean for academic affairs

Grady College has announced the appointment of Janice Hume, the Carolyn McKenzie and Don E. Carter Chair for Excellence in Journalism, as the new associate dean for academic affairs effective Aug. 1, 2022.

Hume is currently the Department of Journalism Head and will assume the associate dean position from María E. Len-Ríos (MA ’95) who is joining the University of Minnesota as associate director of the Hubbard School of Journalism.

“Dr. Hume has been a stellar leader in the College, and the Journalism department has been as strong as ever under her leadership as department chair,” said Charles N. Davis, dean of Grady College. “The addition of Dr. Hume to this next level of our leadership team will ensure that we continue progress toward our commitment to excellence, growth and educational leadership on behalf of our students.”

In her new role, Hume will continue as the named Carter Chair which was awarded to her in 2015.

“The College means a lot to me,” Hume said, “and I look forward to serving it in a new way. I’m excited about the challenge.”

Janice Hume shakes hands with a Levin Leader as Keith Herndon looks on.
Janice Hume shakes hands with Madison Franklin as Keith Herndon prepares to present Franklin with a Levin Leader medal March 3, 2022.

Hume joined Grady College in 2001 and became Department of Journalism head in 2013. She teaches courses in media history, ethics & diversity and media credibility on the undergraduate and graduate level. Her research focuses on American journalism history, public memory and media coverage of death and is frequently quoted in the media about the role obituaries have in collective memory. Hume received her Ph.D., master’s and bachelor of journalism degrees from the University of Missouri.

Prior to joining UGA, Hume spent twelve years as a newspaper reporter and features editor. She was lifestyle and arts editor at the Mobile Register (Alabama) and she served on the faculty of the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Kansas State University. She has authored three books including her most recent, “Popular Media and the American Revolution.” She has also published research in a number of academic journals, including “Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly,” “Journalism History” and “American Journalism,” among others.

Hume has been the recipient of the American Journalism Historians Association’s National Award for Excellence in Teaching. She is an SEC Academic Leadership Development Program Fellow and served on the Scripps Howard Academic Leadership Academy.

“I am forever grateful to the faculty and staff in Journalism,” Hume added. “They are a remarkable, talented group of scholars, teachers and colleagues. They always step up when needed, and that has made my time as department head a real joy.”

Grady faculty and graduate students present at ICA conference

Several Grady College faculty and graduate students will present their research at the annual International Communication Association Conference May 26-30.

The hybrid conference takes place in Paris as well as virtually.

Among the highlights are a presentation by graduate student Haley Hatfield and co-author Sun Joo (Grace) Ahn that was awarded one of the Top Four Papers in the Information Systems Division. The paper is titled “Do Black Lives Matter in the Empathy Machine? Investigating Whiteness and Immersion on Creating a Shared Reality with 360-Degree Video,” and studies the different impact of Black and white speakers delivering anti-racist messages using a 360-degree video platform.

During the conference, Kyser Lough will complete his term as secretary for the Visual Communication Studies division of ICA. He will also chair a Journalism Studies session during the conference.

Other faculty and graduate students participating in the ICA conference include (listed in chronological order of presentation):

Friday, May 27
  • Virtual Poster Presentation (virtual, all day) Graduate students Xuerong Lu, Haley R. Hatfield, Shuoya Sun, Youngji Seo (PhD ’22), Solyee Kim (PhD ’22), Sung In Choi, Wenqing Zhao and Jeffrey Duncan; and faculty members Hye Jin Yoon, Bartosz Wojdynski and Glenna L. Read presenting “Gaining Insights into Effects Appeals for COVID-19 Vaccine Messages Targeting 18-23 Year Old College Students”
  • Virtual Poster Presentation (virtual, all day) Solyee Kim (PhD ’22) presents her poster, “Making Sense of DEI: The Construction of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Public Relations Agencies in the United States.”
  • 8 to 9:15 a.m., Juan Meng, Tong Xie (Ph.D. ’22), Jeonghyun Lee (graduate student), presenting “Understanding the competency spectrum for communication management: The need, the gap, and the continuous learning mindset.”
  • 3:30 to 4:45 p.m., Haley R. Hatfield (graduate student) and Sun Joo (Grace) Ahn, “Do Black Lives Matter in the Empathy Machine? Investigating Whiteness and Immersion on Creating a Shared Reality with 360-Degree Video.”
  • 8 to 9:15 p.m. (Virtual presentation), Sung In Choi (graduate student) Sungsu Kim (PhD ’19) and Yan Jin and others present, “Trust and Cultural Factors Shaping COVID-19 Vaccination Intentions Across Six Countries.”
Saturday, May 28
  • 9 to 10:45 a.m. Juan Meng chair session “Issues in Digital PR: AI Applications and Digital Ethics” and will present a paper she was co-author on, “Ethical Challenges of Digital Communication in Public Relations: A Comparative Study of Individual, Organizational, and National Factors in 52 Countries.”
  • 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. Ivanka Pjesivac presents research she was a lead author on entitled, “Between the Facts and a Hard Place: Trust Judgments and Affective Responses in Information-Seeking Processes During Early COVID-19.”
  • 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Juan Meng will present a paper she co-authored entitled, “Toward an integrated model of healthy food choice: Examining the moderated mediation effects via online search for nutrition information.”
  • 5 to 6:15 p.m. Ivanka Pjesivac (faculty); Leslie Klein (graduate student); Wenqing Zhao (graduate student); Xuerong Lu (graduate student); Yan Jin (faculty) present in an interactive poster session featuring their research, “Factors That Impact COVID-19 Conspirational Beliefs and Health-Related Behaviors.”
  • 8:30 to 9:45 p.m. (Virtual Session) Alumni, graduate students and faculty including Taylor S. Voges; Solyee Kim (PhD ’22); LaShonda L. Eaddy (PhD ’17); Jeonghyun J. Lee; Sara Ervin; Yan Jin; and Bryan Reber  present “Threat Assessments and Organization Resources for DEI and Ethics: Practitioner Insights on Sticky Crises.”
Sunday, May 29
  • 8 to 9:15 a.m. Juan Meng presents a paper she co-authored entitled, “Examining the characteristics and virtues associated with servant leadership in public relations.”
  • 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Kyser Lough presents his research, “Visual News Practices: Ethics, Power and History Panel Session, Visual Communication Studies.”
  • 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Yan Jin chairs a session about COVID-19 and Public Relations
  • 8 to 9:15 p.m. (Virtual presentation) Graduate students, alumni and faculty including Taylor S. Voges; Yan Jin; LaShonda L. Eaddy (Ph.D. ’17) and Xuerong Lu present “Responding to Fire Ignited From Outside: Explicating “Crisis Spillover” Through the Multi-Layered Lens of Organizational Crisis Communication.
Monday, May 30
  • 9:30 a.m. Karin Assmann (faculty) presents her research about German reporters’ and news organizations responses to physical attacks, “Enemy in the streets: German journalists on the defensive” on the panel, “Enemies of the Press: Global Harassment, Abuse and Violence Against Journalists.”
  • 12:30 p.m. Karin Assmann presents her co-authored paper, “Women in newsroom leadership in Germany 30 years after reunification:  A West German domain?” as part of the session, “Women in Journalism: Newsrooms, Unions, Protests and Online Hate.”
  • 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Michael Cacciatore, Juan Meng and Bryan Reber will present their research paper, “Leveraging the cybersecurity function to build influence and strategy: An empirical study of public relations professionals’ cybersecurity acumen.”

Journalism student Ciera Walker named 2022 Disney UNCF Corporate Scholar

Ciera Walker, a Journalism student from Columbus, Georgia, has been selected by the Walt Disney Company and the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) to be a 2022 Disney UNCF Corporate Scholar. Walker is one of just 21 students throughout the United States to be awarded this opportunity.

Through the highly competitive program, Walker will be interning with ESPN’s social media team, working alongside professionals in the department to create and produce content for ESPN’s social media platforms.

Ciera Walker stands outside wearing an ESPN shirt.
Walker, who is on track to graduate in 2024, is a Film minor. (Photo: Submitted.)

While the internship, which runs from June 6 to August 12, is primarily virtual, Walker will have the opportunity to travel to ESPN’s headquarters in Bristol, Connecticut, during the summer to meet the ESPN social team and other ESPN interns in person.

“This accomplishment gives me the opportunity to learn, network and grow within the media industry,” said Walker. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to work alongside ESPN executives who can share their experience and offer feedback or advice on what I need to do to excel in this career. It’s not often that you’re able to learn and develop your personal skills while also being paid, so I’m grateful for this privilege.”

In addition to receiving a paid summer internship, each Disney UNCF Corporate Scholar is awarded a $5,000 annual scholarship, mentorship opportunities and assistance securing possible full-time roles with Disney after graduation.

“Being a Disney UNCF Corporate Scholar means a lot to me,” Walker added. “I’m able to learn from industry professionals already working in positions I aspire to be in one day, and I also have the opportunity to mature as a leader. What I enjoy most so far is being able to connect with the other scholars who are succeeding in their own ways and getting to share our knowledge with one another.”

As a Corporate Scholar, Walker will be joining a growing cohort of students supported by the program, which, according to Disney, is designed to nurture rising Black talent pursuing degrees in finance, human resources, legal, production/media and technology.

“Disney’s longstanding relationship with UNCF, including our collaboration on this scholarship program, is an important part of our efforts to reimagine tomorrow by amplifying underrepresented voices and untold stories,” said Latondra Newton, Disney’s senior vice president and chief diversity officer. “For more than 75 years, UNCF has helped generations of students claim a brighter future. Together, we’re carrying on this proud legacy, ensuring promising students are supported in their education and connected with Disney mentors and career opportunities.”