D.C. Alumni Networking Reception

Help welcome Grady students and faculty visiting D.C. for the annual PRSSA agency tour, while networking with fellow D.C. area alumni and friends.

Registration information coming soon.

Alumni Advice: Noelle Lashley and Kevin Schatell

Graduation is the end goal of attending college, but getting there can be stressful. Hear from recent Grady grads about their life after graduation and what they wish they had known before entering into the “real world.”

What do you wish you had known before graduating?

Noelle Lashley, Missoula morning reporter for Wake Up Montana: “I wish I’d known that nothing could truly prepare me for the experience of my first job. I actually made myself sick during my last semester of college because I was so focused on becoming perfectly ready to dive into my first reporting gig, but life doesn’t work that way.”

Kevin Schatell, associate producer at NBC News: “My advice to current journalism students? Seek out what scares you and learn all that you can. As a student, I think I was too wrapped up in the idea of wanting to be creative and produce content, and I wish I’d taken more time to be curious and learn about the areas of the media industry that intimidated me.”

What did you learn outside the classroom that could have been helpful inside the classroom?

Come prepared with pitches

“Don’t be afraid to talk about your ideas. Sometimes when I was in college, I’d shut down because I was afraid of looking or sounding silly. I’d miss out on an opportunity to do a great story because I was afraid of what someone would think of me and my pitch. Nope. Throw that way of thinking out the window. Come to class or a pitch meeting with tons of ideas in your back pocket. The majority of them might not work, and that’s OK. Talk them out. Come at them from a few different angles. Try something completely outside the norm. You’re only going to find the great ones if you’re willing to dig and kiss a few frogs in the process.” Noelle Lashley

Communication across all platforms

“A crucial skill in my job — and the industry as a whole — is communication in all directions. On a daily basis, I manage interns and NBC Pages, pitch to executive producers and provide customer service for the audience that visits the Today Show. Equally as important as communication in all directions is communication on all platforms. Each day consists of public speaking in front of large crowds, one-on-one conversations, emails, phone calls and social media posts. Each of those has to be delivered in a unique way but with a consistent voice. The people I’ve seen who are thriving in the media industry are self-aware and able to tailor their communication style depending on their audience. The more you can intentionally craft your written and verbal communication skills, the better.” –Kevin Schatell

What advice do you have for current students now that you have seen the other side of graduating?

Get out of your comfort zone

Don’t let your life be governed by fear of the unknown.

I have a necklace that says, “life begins at the edge of your comfort zone.” It’s true. I originally thought I was going to stay in Georgia for my first job. I had it all planned out…then I realized that I needed to step outside of my own comfort zone. There was a little nudge inside me that kept telling me to look at Montana. I made an excel spreadsheet of every local news station in the state, and I would cycle through the stations every few days to look for openings. No one in my family had ever lived in Montana. I had one friend who lived there, and he was hours away from any of the stations I was considering. My entire existing support system was on the east coast. People’s reaction to my goal ranged from disbelief to disgust to full conversations about how my choice was going to wreck my career. I was scared, but I knew I’d regret it for the rest of my life if I didn’t try. I tried. Now I’m the sole morning reporter for my station in Missoula, Montana. It’s one of the most challenging things I’ve ever done, but I know I’m exactly where I’m supposed to be. I’ve only been on air for six weeks, and I’ve already had incredible opportunities that I never would have been given in a larger market. I’ve made wonderful friends, and I don’t feel alone or isolated anymore. I get to look outside and see snow-capped mountains when I’m driving around for work, and I’m trying things I never would have done in Georgia. I’m sure I’ll look back on my life and have regrets at the end, but I’m not going to wish that I had taken a chance on myself in my 20s. I did.

Your greatest victories and your greatest challenges are waiting for you. Don’t miss out on them because you let fear decide your destiny. Noelle Lashley

Act like an owner

One of our core values at NBCUniversal is ownership. That’s not something I spent a lot of time thinking about in college, but I wish I had. The idea is to act like an owner, not a renter. For example: if you’re renting an apartment and you discover a hole in the wall, what do you do? If you’re like me, your instinct is likely to cover it with a picture frame and think “Eh, not my problem — someone else will fix that.” The difference is, as an owner, you have a bigger investment. You’d fix the hole rather than cover it up. That’s how we’re encouraged to treat our work. There’s no room for a “that’s not my problem” mentality in the news and entertainment industries. Focus on having an owner’s mentality in all the work you do, whether it’s classes, organizations on campus, internships or a full-time job. Kevin Schatell

Remembering Wally Eberhard

He was a self-professed lover of libraries, a master of journalism history and a dedicated professor who taught hundreds of Grady College students a craft to last throughout their lives.

Wallace B. “Wally” Eberhard, professor of journalism emeritus, died Oct. 7, 2018. He passed away on his 87th birthday.

“Grady College has lost one of its iconic faculty members, and I’m struggling to envision life without Wally in it,” said Charles Davis (MA ’89), dean of Grady College. “I am eternally indebted to him and will never think of him without smiling. His was a life well lived.”

“His was a life well lived.” — Charles Davis

Eberhard joined the Grady College faculty in 1970 as a temporary assistant professor, following several years as a reporter. He rose up the academic ranks, serving as full professor from 1984 until his retirement in 2000. Even after his retirement, Eberhard continued his involvement with Grady College by attending countless lectures and Homecoming tailgate celebrations, consulting with faculty and teaching.  Most recently, he taught the Freshman Year Odyssey seminar, “A Short History of Long Journalism,” from 2011 until 2017.

Homecoming tailgates were a favorite time for Wally Eberhard to return to visit with alumni, including Chris Jones and his wife, Toni, during the 2011 celebration.

In addition to teaching, Eberhard was involved with Grady organizations including serving as a Peabody Awards judge from 2007 to 2011 and again in 2013, and advising the student chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists during the 1980s, when it was known as Sigma Delta Chi.

Davis and Eberhard knew each other for nearly 30 years, first meeting when Davis was a graduate student at Grady College and Eberhard took him under his wing. “He remained a constant, positive presence in my life. For many Grady students, he and Conrad Fink served as equal parts mentor and friend. Never, ever too busy to take a call or break away for lunch, Wally took such familial pride in us as our careers took shape. He always knew where we were and what we were up to, serving as a Grady social network long before Facebook or Twitter.”

The study of journalism history held a special place in Eberhard’s life. He was editor of the American Journalism Historian’s Association refereed journal, “American Journalism,” for four years, and received the association’s highest honor, the Sidney Kobre Award for Lifetime Achievement in Journalism History, in 2007. He initiated Grady College’s first graduate seminar on media history and guided the work of many graduate students in this area.

John English, Grady professor of journalism emeritus, had a friendship with Eberhard that spanned nearly 50 years and went back to their time as graduate students at the University of Wisconsin where they originally met because their last names started with the letter “E.” Their friendship continued to their days teaching at Grady College where their offices were next door to one another.

In addition to his sense of humor, English found a lot of reasons to be fond of Eberhard.

“Wally Eberhard was an exemplar of old-school journalism,” English said, remembering his friend. “As a former journalist himself, he taught a generation of Georgia journalism students the fundamentals of reporting and editing, professional ethics and press law and media history.  While modest in demeanor, he held rigorous academic standards.”

One of these students was author Steve Oney (ABJ ’79). During a lecture in 2017 discussing his most recent book, “A Man’s World,” Oney reflected on how Eberhard helped him become a better writer.

Wally Eberhard (l) taught a generation of Georgia journalism students the fundamentals of reporting and editing, professional ethics and press law and media history.

In his comment, Oney credited Eberhard with helping him “become a more rigorous thinker and better reporter and a more honest human being, and training me in the virtues of making my work add up. You have to be creative and you have to be imaginative, but you can’t take any fliers if you are writing journalism. It has to add up. It’s about a factual presentation of the world.”

According to English, Eberhard’s journalistic ethos also informed his retirement years.  He sought more transparency in government, especially with public funds, and he was a model citizen in action, serving on the local library board for 20 years.

“Our friendship across the aisle endured a half century because, while we differed and disagreed, we never argued or got angry,” English said.  “That’s old school, too.”

English continued: “During lunch recently, Eberhard and I discussed the current attacks on the press.  Later that day he wrote this indelible statement: ‘The press may be threatened, but it always has been—quite rightfully—criticized.  Imperfect though it may be, without a free press there is no working democracy.  Getting the public to understand and agree with that is an ongoing challenge.’”

Like Davis and Oney, Keith Herndon (ABJ ’82), the William S. Morris Chair in News Strategy and Management at Grady College, had a relationship with Eberhard that dated back to his days as an undergraduate student during the early 1980s. Eberhard served as an instructor, advisor and friend to Herndon, which even included Eberhard giving the young Herndon a ride from Indianapolis to Athens, Georgia, following an internship.

When Herndon was president of Sigma Delta Chi, he worked closely with Eberhard, who advised the student group.

“He helped us with speakers and organized a conference trip to D.C. He used that organization to take us beyond the classroom, and looking back on those years now, you realize how incredibly supportive he was,” Herndon said. “He was always in my corner and always available for mentoring and advice.”

“He was always in my corner and always available for mentoring and advice.” — Keith Herndon

As the years unfolded, Herndon valued his many lunches with Eberhard. “He had a keen appreciation for the news media and its history. Every lunch with him was a media history lesson, but he had an uncanny way of tying history to the present day,” Herndon said. “I always left those lunches with some new insight to contemplate. He never stopped being my professor.”

Tom Russell was dean of Grady College for several years that Eberhard taught.

“With both an academic and professional background, Wally brought a unique perspective to the Journalism Department,” Russell said.  “He came to Grady during a period of rapid change in journalism education and he was a valuable contributor in revamping the curriculum, including a move to the semester system.  I know that he will be remembered not only by his faculty colleagues, but by the hundreds of students he influenced.”

For other remembrances of Wally Eberhard, please visit:

Wally Eberhard Obituary

RIP, Professor Wally, I will miss you (Macon Telegraph), by Ed Grisamore (ABJ ’78)

Remembering Prof. Wally Eberhard (Flagpole magazine), by John English

Grady Alumni thrive in Washington, D.C.

Beyond the artifacts of American history that we all know and love, our nation’s capital is a bustling city filled with countless opportunities for communications professionals beginning their careers. Grady College is actively preparing students for these opportunities through its Public Affairs Communications (PAC) program and the Grady@DC summer program. Today, Grady’s young alumni working in Washington D.C. are thriving. Recent PAC and Grady@DC graduates including Adelaide Miller (ABJ ’17), Thomas Jordan (ABJ ’17), Abby McHan (ABJ ’17) and Jenni Sweat (ABJ ’17) are already doing remarkable things in Washington, D.C.

Miller, a public relations major and English minor, knew she wanted to use her passion for communications in “a field of utmost importance to the American people: government.” Her career journey began as an intern for the Alabama Republican Party. Miller currently works as the executive assistant to the director of the White House Office of Public Liaison, which serves as the external-facing office for the White House. Her role involves overseeing the day-to-day operations of the director, communicating with senior staff in the West Wing and drafting memos for presidential events.

“Grady College prepared me well with the skillsets I need to excel in my daily work at the White House,” Miller said. “I am constantly writing official documents and interacting with key stakeholders, and I have to have a strategic mindset in every facet of communication.”

Thomas Jordan (far right) and some Semester in Washington Colleagues

Among the variety of courses that Grady offers are several classes focusing on public affairs to aid students who are interested in working in the political arena. Grady and the School of Public and International Affairs (SPIA) jointly offer their students the opportunity to obtain a Public Affairs Professional Certificate.

When Thomas Jordan first heard of the PAC program, he knew that “this was the direction in life I wanted to work toward.” Jordan currently works at the National Retail Federation as a media relations coordinator. He handles media inquiries, conducts media monitoring and research, coordinates interviews and tracks policy.

“Of all the classes I’ve taken in my life, from elementary school to the college level, the courses I took in the PAC program have been the most relevant and practical,” Jordan commented. “The course material has had a clear and direct connection to the work that I do daily, and it has absolutely helped me achieve the success I’ve had in my young career.”

Abby McHan and Jenni Sweat also took advantage of the PAC program during their time at Grady. Each serves as a press assistant on Capitol Hill and continues to utilize the skills they learned.

“When the PAC certificate program was announced, I thought it was the perfect opportunity to build upon my current skillset and jumpstart a career in public policy and advocacy,” Sweat said. “I’m grateful for Ms. Carolyn Tieger’s vision for this program. Without it, I would not be where I am today.”

“I chose to pursue the PAC certificate because I wanted to strength my education background in both public relations and political science,” McHan echoed. “The PAC certificate taught me a lot about the importance of building your network, and these professionals opened my eyes to the options that could become available for me later on in my career.”

McHan’s first experience in D.C. was through Grady@DC. The Grady@DC summer program offers students the opportunity to pair classroom study with experiential learning in Washington, DC.  Through this program, Grady students are able to make meaningful contributions to the nation’s public life and gain real insights into what a life and career in Washington might resemble. This experience set the foundation for McHan’s career on Capitol Hill when she landed her first congressional internship with Rep. Tom Graves. During her final semester, she interned for Rep. Doug Collins in his district office. Two months before graduation, McHan reached out to the communications director and within a month was offered a job as a press assistant in the D.C. office.

As a press assistant, McHan, supports the communications director by monitoring media hits, assisting in digital communications and drafting speeches and newsletters. She also assisted in the construction and launch of the website design, serving as the primary point of contact for the website development team.

PAC Certificate founder Carolyn Tieger (ABJ ’69) and Abby McHan

Sweat first came to D.C. during the Washington Semester program and got her start on the Hill as an intern in Sen. David Perdue’s office. The University of Georgia’s Washington Semester program provides students in all majors the opportunity to earn class credit while gaining valuable work experience in D.C. Before her final semester at UGA, Sweat was offered a full-time position Senator Perdue’s office and she finished her degree in D.C. through online classes and independent studies.

“I talked with my advisors and professors at Grady and they recognized what a great opportunity this was,” Sweat reflected. “Thanks to the support of everyone involved, I managed to graduate on time!”

Currently, Sweat works as a press assistant for Perdue. Her job duties range from responding to press inquiries to creating original video content and designing graphics.

While the career journeys of these four alumni are just beginning, they all have similar advice to pass on to the next generation of Grady grads. For those who want to be successful in their career, particularly working on Capitol Hill, Sweat advises to “find your boss’s voice, know your audience, have a message and drive it, think outside the box and learn some policy.”

“I encourage every student, regardless of their degree, to pursue internships and work experience as soon as you can,” Jordan said. “As a young professional, you will have to prove your ‘worth’ and having the experience really helps bolster your credibility and professional confidence.”

“Keep your head down and work hard,” Miller concludes. “There is so much to be learned at the start of your career, and it’s valuable to surround yourself with smart, driven people who have had a long career in your field. Learn as much as you can from them! They want to help you. “

Lauren Pearson among seven Grady College alumni inducted into UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2018

The University of Georgia’s Alumni Association annually recognizes outstanding alumni who have made an impact in their careers through its 40 Under 40 program. Grady College is proud to have seven honorees in the 40 Under 40 Class of 2018: Brooke Bowen (ABJ ‘07, JD ‘10), Chase Cain (ABJ ’05), Meredith Dean (ABJ ‘14), Josh Delaney (ABJ’11, AB ‘11), Ivey Evans (ABJ ’06, BBA ’06, MBA ‘13), Quanza Griffin (ABJ ‘01) and Lauren Pearson (ABJ ‘02).

Selections were based on the graduates’ commitment to a lifelong relationship with UGA and their impact in business, leadership, community, artistic, research, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors. The 2018 Class will be honored at the awards ceremony on Sept. 13, 2018, at the Georgia Aquarium.

Name: Lauren Pearson

Graduation Year: 2002

Current Occupation: Managing director, partner, HighTower Twickenham

Grady College: How did Grady College help prepare you for your career? 

Lauren Pearson: Grady College gave me the opportunity to learn how to think, and thus provided me with a skill set that was transferrable across industries.

GC: What advice do you have for today’s Grady College students/young professionals? 

LP: Be open to varied and unexpected work experiences in your twenties. You never know where life is going to take you. I sold advertising space in a journal just after I graduated – unexpected and unglamorous and I loved every minute – but both the sales experience and the introduction to potential clients paved the way for my current career.

GC: What experience during your time at Grady College had the biggest influence on where you are today? 

LP: Grady offered numerous opportunities to learn to communicate persuasively and effectively in myriad situations: one-on-one, in a boardroom, before a large audience or on social media. The ability to communicate clearly, succinctly and memorably serves me daily in my career.

GC: What skills and/or values and/or circumstances do you most attribute to your success? 

LP: It is important to carry personal values into professional life. The financial world is not exactly known for its ethical standards, but I have to stick to what I know is good and true personally in my professional life. Two years ago, I transitioned from a large wirehouse investment firm to a fiduciary firm because it was the right move for my clients, and not from a place of self-interest. When you make decisions with those you serve in mind, you can sleep well at night, and often, you come out ahead in your own career.

GC: What has been the most important lesson you’ve learned as you’ve navigated through your career? 

LP: Take big chances and be grateful when they come before you. It is unusual for a 38-year-old woman to have her own investment practice. I questioned the opportunity a thousand times along the way, but in the end, I am a person of faith, and I believe in the purpose behind my work because I have seen the long-term impact of wise financial planning, and thus was able to take the plunge to open my own business. I am very grateful for the opportunity to serve families every day.

GC: Describe a moment in your professional/personal career that you are most proud of. 

LP: I am proud to be a working mom. Motherhood is a tough journey whether you work inside or outside the home, and I am happy to be raising three girls who I hope will follow their dreams, whatever they may be. They are five, seven and nine, and they cannot fathom that Mommy works with “boys” all day, but I tell them, “if you love it, it doesn’t matter what other people think or if they are all ‘boys.’”

GC: Do you have a favorite Grady memory? 

LP: My favorite Grady memory was creating Tiffany & Company ads in graphic design class. I love to create things – whether that be ads or financial plans!

Quanza Griffin among seven Grady College alumni inducted into UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2018

The University of Georgia’s Alumni Association annually recognizes outstanding alumni who have made an impact in their careers through its 40 Under 40 program. Grady College is proud to have seven honorees in the 40 Under 40 Class of 2018: Brooke Bowen (ABJ ‘07, JD ‘10), Chase Cain (ABJ ’05), Meredith Dean (ABJ ‘14), Josh Delaney (ABJ’11, AB ‘11), Ivey Evans (ABJ ’06, BBA ’06, MBA ‘13), Quanza Griffin (ABJ ‘01) and Lauren Pearson (ABJ ‘02).

Selections were based on the graduates’ commitment to a lifelong relationship with UGA and their impact in business, leadership, community, artistic, research, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors. The 2018 Class will be honored at the awards luncheon on Sept. 13 at the Georgia Aquarium.

Grady College will release profiles of the winners leading up to the awards luncheon.

Name: Quanza Griffin

Graduation Year: 2001

Quanza outside of the CDC

Occupation: Public Health Analyst, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Grady College: How did Grady College help prepare you for your career?

Quanza Griffin: Grady College has wonderful faculty and staff, and I was challenged and inspired by all of my professors.  Dr. Lariscy was tough but fair.  Dr. Acosta-Alzuru was demanding but welcoming.  They motivated me to always do my best, because my work is a reflection of me. While at Grady, I had several opportunities to help me prepare for my career. For example, in 2000, I received an award and scholarship from the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA).  I used the scholarship money to help fund a down payment for a car.  That car allowed for me to travel to Atlanta for job interviews and ultimately my first job at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

It was amazing to see how my journalism and PR skills could be applied towards promoting public health at CDC.  My first internship was with the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (CDC peer-reviewed journal).  Working with this journal allowed me to learn about different health challenges faced by communities.  This experience caused me to fall in love with public health.  During my senior year, I worked at CDC Monday, Wednesday and Friday and commuted to Athens on Tuesday and Thursday.  Receiving the PRSSA award because of my student work with Grady benefitted me for years to come.

After that internship, I decided to stay with CDC, and I have been here for over 15 years!  I would have never guessed that my journey at Grady would bring me to a point where I promote public health and disease prevention across the world, and work with people of different culture and backgrounds. Without Grady, I am not sure I would have taken this path. Grady provided a positive learning environment and the opportunity for me to develop my skills and discover my passions – all which guided me to a fulfilling public health career.

GC: What skills and/or values and/or circumstances do you attribute most to your success?

QG: Throughout my career, I have always had a natural inclination to want to help others.  To be a leader and to succeed, you must first be a servant.  It’s my goal to carry the title of “servant” in all aspects of my life. For example, I am a servant in the office, my community and in my family.  Being a servant allows me to put the needs of others first and, ultimately, help others develop and grow.  Many may wonder how serving someone could have personal benefits. My pastor, Andy Stanley, gave a great answer. He stated, “The value of life is always determined by how much of it is given away.”  Having a servant lifestyle is invaluable.

I attribute the value of servant-leadership to my success.  Having a servant-mindset has allowed me to soar in my career and community.  Recently, I started a community garden in a low-income area of Decatur, Georgia.  This garden will provide fresh fruits and vegetables for community members and provide an after-school program for the elderly and children.  This initiative was started because I saw a community in need, and I wanted to help.  I have galvanized residents and community organizations to pull together resources to make the garden accessible and successful.

GC: What has been the most important lesson you’ve learned as you’ve navigated through your career?

Quanza with her children, Kylah and Christopher.

QG: The most important lesson I have learned is that failure does not exist.  I believe failure should be considered a naughty word!  Failure is only a successful way of learning what does and does not work.  Failure is an opportunity to take a lesson and improve upon your skills and mindset.  There have been many times in which some might have I thought I failed.  But, those “failures” have allowed me to be better prepared and more equipped for future challenges. For example, I have always wanted to own a business. I have attempted several business ideas in the past. But, ultimately, my mistakes allowed me to grow mentally and spiritually. After prayer and meditation, I was lead to start a business in which I can earn additional income and do what I love. I started Griffin Treasures by Q photography and photo booth. It has been extremely successful and allowed me to meet with clients such as Steve Harvey, Dark and Lovely and famed photographer, Rob Ector. One of my greatest clients for photo booth has been the University of Georgia. So, failure is just a stepping stone to get to where you need to be.

GC: Describe a moment in your professional/personal career that you are most proud of. 

QG: There are two moments that I am most proud of in my life – the birth of my two kids.  Kylah (4) and Christopher (2) are literally the salt of my life.  They bring hope and joy in all circumstances.  I enjoy teaching them how to be leaders that serve and help others.  It is exciting to know that one day, they could continue the legacy and become alums of the University of Georgia.  I am also teaching them the importance of college football.

Ivey Evans among seven Grady alumni inducted into UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2018

The University of Georgia’s Alumni Association annually recognizes outstanding alumni who have made an impact in their careers through its 40 Under 40 program. Grady College is proud to have seven honorees in the 40 Under 40 Class of 2018: Brooke Bowen (ABJ ‘07, JD ‘10), Chase Cain (ABJ ’05), Meredith Dean (ABJ ‘14), Josh Delaney (ABJ’11, AB ‘11), Ivey Evans (ABJ ’06, BBA ’06, MBA ‘13), Quanza Griffin (ABJ ‘01) and Lauren Pearson (ABJ ‘02).

Selections were based on the graduates’ commitment to a lifelong relationship with UGA and their impact in business, leadership, community, artistic, research, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors. The 2018 Class will be honored at the awards luncheon on Sept. 13 at the Georgia Aquarium.

Grady College will release profiles of the winners leading up to the awards luncheon.

Name: Ivey Evans

Graduation Year: 2006

Current Occupation: Director of digital marketing, Childcare Network, Inc.

Grady College: How did Grady College help prepare you for your career?

Ivey Evans: My experience at Grady absolutely helped me in my career. The capstone advertising campaigns class where we had to create a complete advertising plan from creative concept to placement not only allowed us to put what we had learned into practice, but also how to work as a team to produce a cohesive, impressive final product for a client. Because of the limited work experience you gain in college, this class and the resulting “book” was invaluable and gave me something I could take into interviews to talk about.

Ivey (left) at the Children’s Miracle Network conference with CMN ambassador, Chloe (middle) and her mentor Carol Cone.(right)

GC: What advice do you have for today’s Grady College students/young professionals?

IE: The world is going digital, and employers are looking to you to help navigate that world as digital natives. Employers also love to see real world experience. I personally have a great passion for volunteering in the community, and this is also a great way to get some work experience! Find a local non-profit or small business and help them out! Set up their social accounts and help them create meaningful content. Show how your efforts are helping drive their business results. It shows initiative, which is something I always look for when interviewing/hiring.

One way to stand out in this increasingly digital world is to also go analog. Always send a timely hand-written thank you note after an interview, meeting with a professional in your desired field, etc. That person will likely keep that note on their desk for some time as well, bringing you top-of-mind. You won’t believe the positive impact of this very simple act!

Finally, having a mentor can be critical in times of transition throughout your career. These relationships will form organically as you enter the workforce, but you have to nurture them! You can learn so much from their experiences, but mentors learn from you as well. They will also give you unfiltered advice, which is often necessary, especially in times of strife. I try to have regular phone “dates” with my mentors that are across the country, and in-person whenever schedules allow! Aim for a monthly check-in to keep up-to-date.

GC: What skills and/or values and/or circumstances do you attribute most to your success?

IE: Word hard AND smart. Be committed to what you are doing, and your manager will see that. Always be willing to learn and ask questions, and never be afraid to admit what you don’t know.

GC: Do you have a favorite Grady memory?

IE: I’ll never forget the first time I watched the Apple 1984 Super Bowl commercial in my intro to advertising class. That commercial still goes down as one of the greats, and is one of the key moments where I realized I loved advertising!

Keith Herndon named Morris Chair

Keith Herndon (ABJ ’82), a professor of practice in journalism, has been named to the William S. Morris Chair in News Strategy and Management by the dean of Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“Keith Herndon is an innovator, an academic entrepreneur who works tirelessly on behalf of Grady students,” said Charles N. Davis, dean of Grady College. “I am delighted to see him uphold the proud legacy of the Morris Chair, which traces its roots to the legendary Conrad Fink. This is an important time for building leadership in journalism, as we work with our colleagues in the profession to help create new ways of producing and monetizing the work we do—and I can’t think of a better person to spearhead these efforts at Grady College.”

Herndon is the third professor to hold the Morris Chair. The late Conrad Fink, a legendary Grady professor, was the initial Morris Chair. He was followed by Professor Kent Middleton, who was head of the journalism department and is now professor emeritus.  The program began in 1995 as a named professorship and was elevated to an endowed chair in 2005.

William S. Morris III established the chair in memory of his late father, William S. Morris Jr., who joined the Augusta Chronicle as a bookkeeper in 1929 and rose through the ranks to publisher. He became the controlling partner in 1945 and developed the company into one of Georgia’s leading communications organizations.

Herndon takes pride in the history of the chair: “We honor the legacy of those represented by this chair—its namesake, its creator and the professors who held it—by moving forward with the challenge of training a next generation of news leaders who are prepared to defend the news media’s vital role in our democracy.”

Funding provided by the endowment will be used to expand graduate education in the area of news strategy and management through new academic and applied research initiatives. These plans include a new doctoral research fellowship and a new master’s level graduate assistantship.  Plans also include expanding Herndon’s collaborations and projects with UGA’s Fanning Institute for Leadership Development in the areas of strategic and ethical leadership.

Herndon will continue as director of the James M. Cox Jr. Institute for Journalism Innovation, Management and Leadership where he leads the Cox Institute Leaders program and the Grady Mobile News Lab.   Herndon, a Grady alumnus from the class of 1982, first taught at Grady as a lecturer in fall 2011. He returned the following year as a visiting professor and held that position until joining the full-time faculty in 2016. Herndon earned a Master of Liberal Studies from the University of Oklahoma in 1997 and completed a Ph.D. in Media and Information from Australia’s Curtin University in 2011.

Prior to teaching at Grady, he ran his own media and technology consulting firm and taught part-time at Kennesaw State University.  Previously, he worked at Cox Enterprises’ Internet division, serving as Vice President of Operations and Vice President for Planning and Product Development. He managed strategic partnerships and led technical diligence on Cox’s new media investments, serving on the board of directors of an investment recipient. He was also Director of Operations at Cox Radio Interactive, a pioneer in streaming media. Herndon began his career while at Grady, working as a reporter for his hometown paper in Elberton, Georgia, and then as a sportswriter for the Anderson (South Carolina) Independent and the Athens Banner-Herald. After graduation, he was a Pulliam Journalism Fellow with The Indianapolis News.  He was a business reporter at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution before becoming assistant business editor, deputy business editor and administrative editor.  Herndon is the author of “The Decline of the Daily Newspaper: How an American Institution Lost the Online Revolution” (Peter Lang, 2012). He also has published two business books about entrepreneurship and innovation.

Josh Delaney among seven Grady College alumni inducted into UGA’s 40 Under 40 Class of 2018

The University of Georgia’s Alumni Association annually recognizes outstanding alumni who have made an impact in their careers through its 40 Under 40 program. Grady College is proud to have seven honorees in the 40 Under 40 Class of 2018: Brooke Bowen (ABJ ‘07, JD ‘10), Chase Cain (ABJ ’05), Meredith Dean (ABJ ‘14), Josh Delaney (ABJ’11, AB ‘11), Ivey Evans (ABJ ’06, BBA ’06, MBA ‘13), Quanza Griffin (ABJ ‘01) and Lauren Pearson (ABJ ‘02).

Selections were based on the graduates’ commitment to a lifelong relationship with UGA and their impact in business, leadership, community, artistic, research, educational and/or philanthropic endeavors. The 2018 Class will be honored at the awards luncheon on Sept. 13, 2018, at the Georgia Aquarium.

Grady College will release profiles of the winners leading up to the awards luncheon.

Name: Josh Delaney

Graduation Year: 2011

Current Occupaion: Senior Education Policy Advisor, U.S. Senate, Office of Sen. Elizabeth Warren

Grady College: How did Grady College help prepare you for your career?

Josh Delaney: In many ways, my entire job is about communicating a message. So my Grady experience – learning how to write persuasively, mastering word economy to deliver a message succinctly and understanding the art of narrative – really helped get my legs under me when it came to being a policy professional in Washington, D.C.

GC: What has been the most important lesson you’ve learned as you’ve navigated through your career?

JD: This may sound cliché, but there is no substitute for working hard and being a nice person. Being pleasant to work with may even be more important than whatever skills you have. You can learn new skills and be a hard worker, but no one wants to work with someone who makes their day miserable. The best thing you can do is decide to be a positive and upbeat presence in your work environment because moods are contagious.

GC: Describe a moment in your professional/personal career that you are most proud of.

JD: I’m most proud of the time I spent in the classroom teaching. Right after college, I taught ninth-graders in Metro Atlanta, and it was the most challenging – yet rewarding – professional experience I will ever have. It was humbling to learn how to handle things outside of my control, while also creating and managing a classroom environment and culture that I could be proud of. On my worst days, I still had fun with my students. And on my best days, my students reminded me why I was there. I’m still in education policy because of my former students and my classroom experience.

GC: Do you have a favorite Grady memory?

JD: My favorite Grady memory was the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity study abroad I did in summer 2010. The group was fantastic, and it was the perfect way to kick off my senior year. We were the only college group at the advertising festival, so we quickly because the star attractions. Professionals from all over the world wanted to get to know us and help us get started on our professional journeys. I never really understood what it meant to network until this experience, and I’m so glad I learned the art of networking before moving to a city like Washington DC.

 

Powell Moore: a heart for public affairs communications and service

One of Grady College’s most highly-regarded public affairs communications alumni, Powell Moore (ABJ ’59), has died.

Moore worked with four United States presidents and spent more than five decades in legislative affairs, public policy and international relations.

“Powell Moore stands as one of Grady’s greatest, a constant force for good, always willing to welcome us to the nation’s capital, where he of course was the stuff of legend,” said Charles Davis, dean of Grady College. “I’m so proud to have known him, and cherish the times spent in his company.”

Moore was surrounded by family when he passed away in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 13.

Amidst his busy career, he always found time for the University of Georgia and Grady College. In the past few years, Moore served on the James M. Cox Jr. Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research Board of Visitors, the School of Public and International Affairs Board of Visitors and the Grady College Public Affairs Communications Board.

Powell Moore shared his experiences as press secretary to Sen. Russell, his eyewitness account to the day President Nixon resigned and his views of the mid-term election to a group of SPIA, Grady and UGA faculty and students on Nov. 3, 2014.

He mentored many Grady College students who wanted to work in Washington, D.C., sponsored a communications collaborative between Grady College and Georgia Military College and was inducted as a Grady College Fellow in the inaugural class in 2008.

Moore had a prolific career in public affairs communications. He served as Representative for the U.S. Secretary of Defense to the Organization for Security and Cooperation, an appointment by George W. Bush. Moore has also served as assistant secretary of state for legislative affairs under President Reagan; on the White House staff under Presidents Nixon, Ford and Reagan; and as chief of staff for Sen. Fred Thompson of Tennessee, among several other jobs. He began his career in 1966 as press secretary to Sen. Richard B. Russell of Georgia.

Moore reflected on his early years growing up in Milledgeville, Georgia; talked about his time as press secretary to Sen. Russell and spoke of his service to the United States during an extensive Russell Library Oral History video interview in 2009. He donated his papers to the Richard B. Russell Library in 2014.

He also shared some thoughts about UGA and his career with Loran Smith (ABJ ’62), during a 2017 interview.

Moore was a faithful supporter of Grady College over the years, returning in 2016 to help teach with Brian Robinson (ABJ ’97) two Introduction to Public Affairs Communications classes.

At the time, Moore said of his experience: “I’ve had some interesting experiences and I wanted to share them with students. The most important lesson we can teach is there is no limit to do what you can achieve if you dream high enough,” Moore said. “The second most important lesson is that words are important. What people say and what they write have true meaning and we need to be disciplined in how we approach the use of the written and spoken word.”

Parker Middleton, a friend of Moore’s and senior director of external programs at Grady College, visited with him just last week in Washington, D.C. “He was such a mentor to all,” Middleton said. “He always reminded us of our higher purpose. He loved, with deeply dedicated service, our University, the state of Georgia and our country.”

Dana Todd (ABJ ’91), Tudor Vlad, Moore, Joseph Watson Jr., and a native of Moldova, spent time in Moldova in 2017 where they delivered a workshop for the Cox Center. (Photo: Joseph Watson, Jr.)

Tudor Vlad, director of the Cox Center, collaborated with Moore over the past several years: “As a Cox International Center Board member, Powell Moore used his extraordinary expertise and extensive contacts to support our unit globally, with a specialized focus in Washington, D.C., and in projects in Eastern and Central Europe. Powell traveled with us many times to represent and promote the University of Georgia and Grady College.”

In 2017, Moore traveled with a Cox Center delegation to Moldova in eastern Europe, helping to deliver a workshop on challenges and solutions of communications in public administration.

While a student at UGA, Moore served in the ROTC and was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon. He was also inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa.

He spoke of his regard for Grady College, John Drewry, who was dean of Grady College at the time he was a student, and of its programs when he was inducted as a Grady Fellow in 2008: “The spirit of Henry Grady that was instilled at the John Drewry school has remained with me for half a century. This spirit led us to lift our sights beyond familiar horizons, to seek challenge, not comfort and to recognize that words can make a difference.”