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Is Facebook making us dumber? Exploring social media use as a predictor of political knowledge Michael Cacciatore

Abstract: With social networking site (SNS) use now ubiquitous in American culture, researchers have started paying attention to its effects in a variety of domains. This study explores the relationships between measures of Facebook use and political knowledge levels using a pair of representative samples of U.S. adults. We find that although the mere use […]

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Determinants of news coverage of the Syrian refugee crisis Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Abstract: This study employed international news flow theory to test the impact of the determinants of foreign news flow on the comprehensiveness of textual and multimedia coverage of the Syrian refugee crisis in the form of a live blog. A content analysis of live blogs (N=195) published in Serbia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the United […]

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US State Department Training Grant David Hazinski

Abstract: David Hazinski will lead the training of eight Kazakhstani journalists, seven women and one man, from different media. They will be at Grady for five weeks beginning in March to look at new news techniques, receive multimedia training, and learn about democratic institutions.

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The effects of culture and performance on trust in news media in post-Communist Eastern Europe Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Abstract: This study tested the influences of cultural and performance factors on trust in news media in Serbia by conducting a survey on a stratified random sample of the Serbian population (N=544). The results show that both factors played a significant role, but that the performance explanation, measured as perception of news media corruption, was […]

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Bringing back full disclosure Charles N. Davis

Abstract: The Freedom of Information Act began as a tool for ensuring full disclosure of federal government agencies, but it has consistently failed to live up to these expectations. Despite frequent amendments, FOIA remains a law rooted in an era of paper record-keeping, where files are created and stored by government, protected from release by […]

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Exploring Linkages Between Perceptions of Freedom and Internet Use Globally Lee B. Becker and Tudor Vlad

Abstract: Different methods exist for measuring Internet access and use around the world. A widely used source of estimates of Internet penetration is the ITU, the United Nations specialized agency for information and communication technologies. ITU gathers its data from a variety of sources, including commercial companies and government ministries This paper compares data gathered […]

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Trends In Public Support For Journalists And The Media Lee B. Becker

Abstract: The public is very critical of the journalists and of the news media, an extensive review of public opinion research over the last 40 years shows. The public has become more critical of journalists and of news organizations over time. What can be done–if anything–to reverse the trends in use and assessment isn’t clear […]

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Curricular Change and Citizen-Centered Journalism Lee B. Becker

Abstract: This report examines eight journalism programs at universities in the United States that have made efforts to change their curricula to embrace citizens in a new way. As such, they are at least to some extent critical of what has been done in the past. And they are suggestive of what might be done […]

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