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Enhancing the understanding of tropical biodiversity: Developing conceptual models and underwater videos for communicating the importance of riparian-river connections in food webs in the Brazilian Pantanal Anandam (Andy) Kavoori

“Enhancing the understanding of tropical biodiversity: Developing conceptual models and underwater videos for communicating the importance of riparian-river connections in food webs in the Brazilian Pantanal.” Global Research Collaboration Grant ($ 3000) Program sponsored by the Office of Research and the Office of Global Engagement, UGA. The Federal University of Mato Grosso Brazil has committed […]

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Affordable Learning Georgia Pilot Grant for Developing an Open-Licensed Historical Game, $9,000. Game title: Justice in Georgia: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Memory of Leo Frank. Janice Hume

Abstract: The game will take place in two parts, in 1915 and 1986, in the aftermath of two of the most notorious crimes in Georgia history, the murder of 13-year-old child laborer Mary Phagan and the lynching of Leo Frank, the Jewish factory supervisor convicted of her murder.  Players will consider the appeal in 1915 […]

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Important tweets matter: Predicting retweets in the #blacklivesmatter talk on Twitter Itai Himelboim and Nah Ray Han

Abstract: Social movements are increasingly using social media, and Twitter in particular, to reach existing and new publics and advance their mission. While historically movements had to rely on traditional media to connect with such publics, via social media any user can share content, helping to connect the key players within the movement to new […]

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Otherization of Africa: How American media framed people with HIV/AIDS in Africa from 1987 to 2017. Michael Cacciatore and Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Abstract: This study examined otherization framing of people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa in American print news from 1987-2007. The results of a content analysis of a representative sample of news articles from three outlets (N=421) show that American media overwhelmingly used otherization frames throughout the 20-year period, resulting in a large percentage of negatively […]

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Constructing an image of the United States in the British and French editorials about WikiLeaks Ivanka (Radovic) Pjesivac

Abstract: In today’s globalized world a country’s image is an important consideration because it can influence that country’s politics and economy (Shimko, 1991;Viosca et al., 2005). Scholars have noted that the news media are considered to be major players in creating national images and swaying public perception of foreign countries (Entman, 2008; Golan & Lee, […]

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The 2014-15 U.S. measles outbreak and parents’ vaccination beliefs, confidence, and intentions Michael Cacciatore, Glen Nowak & Nathaniel J. Evans

Abstract: While it seems intuitive that highly visible vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks should impact perceptions of disease risk and facilitate vaccination, few empirical studies exist to confirm or dispel these beliefs. This study investigates the impact of the 2014-15 Disneyland measles outbreak on parents’ vaccination attitudes and future vaccination intentions. The analysis relies on a pair […]

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Inadequate and incomplete: Chinese newspapers’ coverage of the first licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in China Michael Cacciatore and Glen Nowak

Abstract: Glaxo Smith Kline’s Cervarix was the first human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine licensed for use in China in July 2016 and officially launched there on July 31, 2017. Since news media content can influence people’s vaccine-related knowledge, understanding, and intentions, a content analysis was used to examine the information conveyed to the public about the […]

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Is Facebook making us dumber? Exploring social media use as a predictor of political knowledge Michael Cacciatore

Abstract: With social networking site (SNS) use now ubiquitous in American culture, researchers have started paying attention to its effects in a variety of domains. This study explores the relationships between measures of Facebook use and political knowledge levels using a pair of representative samples of U.S. adults. We find that although the mere use […]

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Partisanship, Individual Differences, and News Media Exposure as Predictors of Conspiracy Beliefs Barry Hollander

Abstract: Conspiracy theories are woven into America’s social and political fabric. While such beliefs help some individuals organize their political world, their popularity also raises concerns about the health of a democracy when those governed also suspect powerful forces work against their interests. The research here examines national survey data to demonstrate such beliefs have […]

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Labor Productivity: Proposing the Economic Metric as an Empirical Leadership Proxy Keith Herndon

Abstract: Leadership is inherently difficult to quantify.  Studies have surveyed and observed behavior in all sorts of organizations attempting to understand relationships and causes and effects of leadership styles and outcomes.  As Yammarino (2013) stated, “we have many empirical studies (quantitative, qualitative, and meta-analyses) on leadership, but theory is still ahead of data.” This paper […]

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