The Most Peaceful Place in the World

Kavoori, A. (2016). The Most Peaceful Place in the World: An Auto-ethnographic account of a visit to the Killing Fields, Cambodia. Cultural Studies / Critical Methodologies, 1-10.

Abstract: This reflexive auto-ethnographic essay of eco-criticism tells the story of the authors visit to Cheung Eeok Killing fields in Cambodia focusing on themes of peace, place, and the politics of cultural renewal in a country devastated by the Khmer Rouge. Informed by the literature of post-colonialism, cultural studies, and identity politics, it offers a pedagogical vision of how such renewal is taking place through tourism (even of a dark kind) and the unsettling (but also inspirational) experience of walking through this liminal space of Cambodian history.
Anandam (Andy) Kavoori 

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