Effects of source credibility via social media on the risk perception and purchase intention of American millennials towards genetically modified foods

Sun, Ruoyu (Grady MA student), Meng, Juan, & Cacciatore, Michael A. (2017). Effects of source credibility via social media on the risk perception and purchase intention of American millennials towards genetically modified foods. Paper accepted for presentation at the 7thInternational Crisis and Risk Communication Conference, Orlando, Fl. March 13-15, 2017.

Abstract: Source credibility has been an important area of research in persuasive communications for quite some time. In the risk communication literature, source cues have been found to impact both individual food risk perceptions and food purchase intentions (e.g., Frewer, Howard, Hedderley, & Shepherd, 1997; Phillips & Hallman, 2013). The rapid development of genetic engineering technology has made genetically modified foods (GM foods) a topic of concern to consumers, policy regulators, researchers and marketing managers. Therefore, this study focuses on investigating the effects of source credibility via social media on public risk perceptions and purchase intentions for GM foods. An understanding of the influence source credibility could possibly generate on risk perceptions and purchase intentions can help strategic communicators as they plan information campaigns, and can also aide in our understanding of the most effective sources for disseminating risk information to the public.

Juan Meng  Michael Cacciatore 

Related Research


The Effect of Brand-issue Fit on a Corporate Health-promotion Campaign

Abstract: This study investigated the effect of perceived brand-issue fit on consumer responses to a health-promotion campaign, and advertising message strategy effects (elaborational vs. relational) on consumer responses under high and low brand-issue fit conditions. Results indicated that a campaign with high brand-issue fit, compared to a campaign with low brand-issue fit, elicited more favorable […]

Jooyoung Kim
read more
Why Do Consumers Use Branded Mobile Apps?

Abstract: Applying Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), this study examined motivations for consumers’ use of mobile apps, and concerns arising from their actual usage. A proposed model, tested using structural equation modeling with a convenience sample of 386 mobile app users, consisted of five types of motivations (i.e., usefulness, convenience, personalization, innovativeness, and social influence) and […]

Jihoon (Jay) KimJoe Phua
read more