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Mcgill Symposium

2010 Visiting Journalists

Javier Garza is editorial director, El Siglo de Torreón

Eric Gay has worked for The Associated Press

Aaron Glantz is an editor at New America Media

Hank Klibanoff is the James M. Cox Jr. Professor of Journalism at Emory University

Paul E. Steiger is the CEO and editor-in-chief of ProPublica/p>

Kayla Williams is a former sergeant and Arabic linguist


Biographies

Kayla Williams Kayla Williams Kayla Williams is a former sergeant and Arabic linguist in a Military Intelligence company of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault). During her deployment to Iraq, Williams was at the forefront of troops' interaction with Iraqis while also navigating the challenges of being part of the 15% of the Army that is female. Kayla is the author of Love My Rifle More Than You: Young and Female in the U.S. Army, a memoir about her experiences negotiating the changing demands on today's military. Ms. Williams graduated cum laude with a BA in English Literature from Bowling Green State University, and earned her Masters in International Affairs with a focus on the Middle East from American University. Kayla is a Truman National Security Project Fellow, a member of the VA Advisory Committee on Women Veterans, and sits on the Board of Directors of Grace After Fire, a nonprofit dedicated to helping women veterans. She currently lives near Washington, D.C. with her husband, a fellow veteran.

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Paul E. Steiger Paul E. Steiger is the CEO and editor-in-chief of ProPublica, a non-profit, nonpartisan investigative-reporting team, based in New York.

Steiger served as the managing editor of the Wall Street Journal from 1991 to 2007. During his tenure, members of the Journal's newsroom staff were awarded 16 Pulitzer Prizes. In addition, a ProPublica reporter received a Pulitzer Prize in May 2010.

Steiger is the chairman of the Committee to Protect Journalists, a New York-based nonprofit that advocates for press freedom around the globe, and a member of the steering committee of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, based in Arlington, Va., which provides free legal assistance to journalists. From 1999 to 2007, he was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board, serving as its chairman in his final year. He is a trustee of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, based in Miami, that funds efforts to enhance journalism and the functioning of American communities.

Awards include the Columbia Journalism Award, the University of Missouri Honor Award for Distinguished Service in Journalism, the Goldsmith Career Award for Excellence in Journalism from Harvard University's Joan Shorenstein Center, the Gerald Loeb Award for lifetime achievement from the John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management at UCLA, the Dean's Medal for Distinguished Leadership from Brandeis University, the Fourth Estate Award from the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., the Decade of Excellence Award from the World Leadership Forum in London, and the American Society of News Editors Leadership Award.

Steiger worked for 15 years as a reporter, the Washington economics correspondent, and the business editor for the Los Angeles Times, and for 26 years as a reporter and editor for the Wall Street Journal. He received a bachelor's degree in economics from Yale University in 1964.

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Hank Klibanoff A native of Alabama, Hank Klibanoff is the James M. Cox Jr. Professor of Journalism at Emory University, and the project managing director of The Civil Rights Cold Cases Project, a foundation-funded investigative reporting project. He is co-author of The Race Beat, which won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize. He is the former managing editor for news at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He is a former metro reporter, national correspondent based in Chicago, business editor, and deputy managing editor of The Philadelphia Inquirer, where he worked for twenty years. He was also a reporter for three years at The Boston Globe and six years in Mississippi for The Daily Herald, the South Mississippi Sun (now the Sun Herald) and the Delta Democrat-Times.

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Aaron Glantz Aaron Glantz Aaron Glantz is an editor at New America Media and a Rosalynn Carter Fellow for Mental Health Journalism at the Carter Center.

He is author of the San Francisco Chronicle best-selling book, How America Lost Iraq, (Penguin, 2005), which describes how the war turned to disaster from the perspective of the Iraqi people.

His most recent book, The War Comes Home: Washington's Battle Against America's Veterans was published in January 2009 by University of California Press.

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Eric Gay Eric Gay has worked for The Associated Press since 1986. Originally based in Dallas, he is currently in the San Antonio AP bureau. Prior to the AP, he worked for two Texas newspapers, the Dallas Times Herald and Denton Record Chronicle. A graduate of the University of North Texas with a degree in Journalism, Eric is married with two children.

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Javier Garza Javier Garza Javier Garza is editorial director, El Siglo de Torreón.

Born in Torreón, in Northern Mexico.

Education: B.A. in Communication Sciences, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, 1996. M.A. in Journalism, University of Texas at Austin, 2001.

In 1997 I joined the newspaper Reforma in Mexico City where I worked in the national desk as an assistant editor, then reporter in several beats (congress, diplomacy, public safety, human rights), and then deputy editor of the National section.

In 1999 I covered the conflict in Kosovo as a stringer for Mexican papers.

In 2002 I returned to Reforma to start and manage its news services (Agencia Reforma). It was the first web-based news service in Latin America.

In 2004 I moved to Washington as a correspondent for Grupo Monitor, a nerwspaper and radio company in Mexico City.

In 2005-2006 I was managing editor at Rumbo de Austin, a start-up company that launched Spanish-language dailies in Austin, Houston, San Antonio and McAllen.

I moved back to Torreon in June of 2006 as editorial director at El Siglo de Torreón, the largest newspaper in the states of Coahuila and Durango. Shortly after, the wave of violence began in the region.

In the past year, I have lectured on violence against the media at the University of Texas at Austin, the University of California at Berkeley, the Interamerican Press Association and the San Antonio Express-News.

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Read the 2010 Symposium report [pdf]