Symposium
> About
> Faculty
> Fellows
     > 2007
     > 2008
     > 2009
     > 2010
     > 2011
     > 2012
     > 2013
     > 2014
     > 2015
     > 2016
     > 2017
> Visiting Journalists
     > 2007
     > 2008
     > 2009
     > 2010
     > 2011
     > 2012
     > 2013
     > 2014
     > 2015
     > 2016
     > 2017
> Symposium Reports
     2007 [pdf]
     2008 [pdf]
     2009 [pdf]
     2010 [pdf]
     2011 [pdf]
     2012 [pdf]
     2013 [pdf]
     2014 [pdf]
     2015 [pdf]
     2016 [pdf]
     2017 [pdf]

Mcgill Symposium

2016 Visiting Journalists

The McGill Symposium will feature the following journalists talking about what journalistic courage means and how it is exemplified by reporters and editors:

Greg Bluestein is a political reporter who covers the governor's office and state politics for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He joined the newspaper in June 2012 after spending seven years with the Atlanta bureau of The Associated Press, where he covered a range of beats that included politics and legal affairs. He also contributes to the AJC's Political Insider blog. He's a graduate of the University of Georgia with degrees in journalism and political science and lives with his wife and two daughters in Dunwoody.

 

Walt Bogdanich is the Pulitzer-Prize winning assistant editor for The New York Times Investigations Desk. Before joining The Times in 2001, he was an investigative producer for “60 Minutes” on CBS and before that for ABC News. Previously, he worked as an investigative reporter for The Wall Street Journal in New York and Washington. Mr. Bogdanich graduated from the University of Wisconsin in 1975 with a degree in political science. He received his master’s in journalism from Ohio State University in 1976. Mr. Bogdanich has been awarded three Pulitzer Prizes. In 2008, he shared the award in investigative reporting with Jake Hooker for “Toxic Pipeline,” articles exposing toxic ingredients in Chinese-made products. In 2005, he won in national reporting for his series, “Death on the Tracks.” He received the 1988 Pulitzer Prize for his articles in The Wall Street Journal on substandard medical laboratories. He has also won four George Polk Awards.

 

Mary Katharine Ham is a senior writer at The Federalist. She is a CNN Contributor and recently co-moderated a GOP primary debate on ABC. She is an editor at BRIGHT. She's the co-author of "End of Discussion: How the Left's Outrage Industry Shuts Down Debate, Manipulates Voters, and Makes America Less Free (and Fun)" and has written for HotAir, The Weekly Standard, and The Daily Caller. A fourth-generation journalist, she did a stint covering NASCAR, high school football, and the county's largest legumes before embracing New Media and heading to Washington DC, where her career goal has been to discover the formula for talking about politics without being a blowhard. She's a mom of two and a Twitter enthusiast who hiked Kilimanjaro on her honeymoon.

 

Louie Palu is an award winning photojournalist and documentary filmmaker who work has been featured in The New York Times, TIME Magazine, PBS Newshour, BBC and many others. He has covered stories worldwide and is best known for his long term coverage of the war in Afghanistan, Mexican drug war and the conflict in East Ukraine. He is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow and is working on a project examining the changing geopolitics of the Arctic.

 

Carrie Seidman, a graduate of the Columbia University School of Journalism, has been a reporter, critic and columnist for daily newspapers for nearly 40 years, including the New York Times, Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, Albuquerque Journal, Albuquerque Tribune and, since 2010, the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Her work on mental health, dance and the arts has received awards from in-house, state and national organizations. “The S Word,” a 2015 special project on schizophrenia, received the Media Award from Mental Health America, the Community Engagement Award from the American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Best Features or Series award from the Society for Features Journalism. Recently, Seidman was selected as a 2016-2017 Carter Center Mental Health Journalism fellow and as a fellow for the National Press Foundation’s Complexities of Mental Health Journalism training. A life-long dancer who competes on the Dancesport ballroom circuit, Seidman is a two-time breast cancer survivor and the single mother of one son with a mental health condition.

 

This is the ninth McGill Symposium. The first was in 2007. The McGill Symposium is funded by the McGill Lecture Endowment.

McGill Symposium, which brings together students, faculty and leading journalists to consider what journalistic courage means and how it is exemplified by reporters and editors. The McGill Symposium is funded by the McGill Lecture Endowment.

The McGill Symposium is not a public event, due to limited seating.

Each year twelve undergraduate and graduate students have been named McGill Fellows by the University of Georgia Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. The students were selected by a faculty committee "for their strengths in academics, practical experience and leadership," said John F. Greenman, professor and Carter Chair in Journalism, who chaired the committee. The first class was selected in 2007.

The McGill Fellows will help to select the next recipient of the McGill Medal, awarded annually to a U.S. journalist whose career has exemplified journalistic courage.

 

Read the 2015 Symposium report. [pdf]